OTC pain medications: guides users should know

When suffering from a headache or other pains, many people are immediately take some OTC  pain medicines. Because for most people, OTC medicines are all that are needed to relieve pain or reduce fever.

However, choosing a right OTC medicines from dozen of boxes on the pharmacy shelves seems to be a confused task for you if you do not know how they works thoroughly. Therefore, knowing how many different types of pain medications are available and which is suitable for you case will make the choice more easier.

Every pain suffered people are all expecting choosing the right over-the-counter pain medication will be a simple process.

The following instructions are expected being helpful for you:

Question (Q): How many types of OTC pain medications are available?

Answer (A): There are two main types are popularly available. The first type is acetaminophen (for example: Tylenol). The second one is nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including:

  • Aspirin (for example: Bayer, St. Joseph)
  • Ibuprofen (for example: Advil, Motrin)
  • Naproxen (for example: Aleve)

Some products contain both acetaminophen and aspirin (brand names: Excedrin Extra Strength, Excedrin Migraine, Vanquish).

Aspirin is one of the most popular OTC pain medications

Q: How do OTC pain medicines work or what are their effects?

A: OTC pain relievers benefit on pain managment, fever reduction and inflammatory fighting. In general, OTC pain medicines are all fine for the two first effects. However, there are some the most unique for each.

Q: So, what are the OTC medicines usage in more detailed?

A: Although all OTC pain medicines are considered to reduce fever, diminish pain and are anti-inflammatory, they can work its full effects for specific cases. For example, acetaminophen or aspirin are the best choice for sore muscles caused by exercising; If you suffer from arthritis or gout, take an NSAID for its anti-inflammatory properties.

Q: My child is suffering from headache and fever, is there special notice?

A: yes, for a child, it is recommended to choose acetaminophen or an NSAID for reducing fever. You should also take advices from pharmacist at best.

Q: What are potential side effects from use of OTC pain medications?

A: Side effects with acetaminophen are rare. However, liver damage can occur if you drink alcohol and take acetaminophen.

NSAIDs may cause upset stomach. They can also cause increased bruising or risk of bleeding in the stomach. When taken regularly, they may cause kidney damage. NSAIDs may also make high blood pressure worse.

Q: I have liver or kidney disease, should I be able to take at the same time NSAIDs ?

A: This matter belongs to case of contraindications. In fact, it is essential to have a prior talk with doctors before taking NSAIDs, specially in use of aspirins. Additionally, in specific cases of you:

  • Are allergic to aspirin or other pain relievers
  • Have 3 or more drinks that contain alcohol every day
  • Have bleeding in the stomach or intestines, or have peptic (stomach) ulcers
  • Have liver or kidney disease
  • Have heart disease
  • Take blood-thinning medicine or have a bleeding disorder

Q: What the last important instruction will be?

A: Last but not least, talk with your family doctor or pharmacists or physician about your confusion of what type are best for your medical conditions. He or she knows your complete history and can give you the best advice about the types and dose.

Above are just suggestions collected from some medical sites, they play as preferential sources, so  before deciding to take any OTC pain medicines, you should ask your doctor for the best direction.

Natural cures to overcome Bipolar disorder

Bipolar disorder belongs to mental health condition describing “mood swings” between periods of a very good or irritable mood (mania) and depression. This type of mood between can be very quick.

The symptoms is divided into three cases:

Bipolar Symptoms: The primary symptoms, patients are in mood swings of dramatic and unpredictable.Mania Symptoms include excessive happiness, excitement, irritability, restlessness, increased energy, less need for sleep, racing thoughts, high sex drive, and a tendency to make grand and unattainable plans. Depression Symptoms may consist of sadness, anxiety, irritability, loss of energy, uncontrollable crying, change in appetite causing weight loss or gain, increased need for sleep, difficulty making decisions, and thoughts of death or suicide.

Here are some tips to pass through naturally Bipolar disorder.

1. Exercises: such as walking, biking, running or swimming, can be low impact, easy on the body, and good for the mind. It can be a primary way of moving head if you have symptoms of bipolar disorder. You should have a routine of exercise at least four times per week, it can be part of a very effective bipolar disorder self-help lifestyle plan, suggested specialists.

2. Hobbies: it can be take up art ( drawing, photography, etc.) or make your habit of reading on spiritual subjects, as well as Bible reading which can all contribute to a stronger mind, stronger spirituality. At the same time, unplug with Movies, Video Games, T.V that is considered to be your depression causes.

3. Social activities: do not isolate yourself, taking part in school activities, joining in some club or interest. And more often share your mind with your family. Also, find more communications and friendships at workplace.

Self help bipolar disorder family

4. A right lifestyle: practice with a diet routine and keep track with your health; keep away from alcohol, and smoking; especially always Keep an Active Mind such as reading and developing interests, learning a new language, playing a musical instrument, finding mentally challenging activities of value and substance, contribute to a stronger mind and can help one to overcome mental health difficulties.

5. Do keep patient. Don’t give up
There are not fast cures and there are no miracle drugs. No drug will answer one’s problems. It takes time and perseverance, hard work and often times, the help of others to overcome bipolar disorder or any other mental health disorder.

 

Facial Surgery May Offer Long-Term Migraine Relief for Some

FRIDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) — Facial surgery to “deactivate” painful migraines may offer some patients long-lasting relief, a new study suggests.

But it should be used only as a ‘last resort,’ expert cautions.

The vast majority of the study participants experienced partial relief from migraines, while one-third saw them disappear, the researchers reported.

Specifically, based on the findings in 69 patients in the five-year follow-up study, 88 percent experienced an improvement in symptoms, 59 percent noted a substantial decrease in symptoms, and 29 percent had their migraine headaches eliminated, the study authors found.

The research was published in the February issue of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery.

Before surgery, patients were given Botox injections to identify which trigger sites caused the pain that they were experiencing. One surgery involved disruption to the frowning muscles in the forehead and relieving pressure on key nerves, the researchers explained. Other surgical options included the temple trigger site and the back of the head, where nerves can also cause migraine headaches.

Dr. Bahman Guyuron, chairman of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at University Hospitals at Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, estimates this surgery may cost around $4,000, and that about half of his patients are paying for their surgery with insurance.

For the minority of patients for whom this surgery did not work (12 percent), Guyuron pointed out that patients could be left with a somewhat immobilized face, while still experiencing migraines.

But in his view, “the immobilization only involves the frowning muscle, which not only is not detrimental to the face, it actually makes the face younger and happier.”

In his studies, Guyuron noted that he became interested in treating migraines resistant to medical management (that is, those in which the migraine drugs typically used didn’t work). In 2009, he led a study that compared a control group of patients getting “sham” surgery with another group receiving surgery on one of three trigger points. He and his colleagues found that 57 percent of the treatment group reported complete elimination of migraine headaches, compared to 4 percent in the fake surgery group.

As with any surgery, of course, there are potential complications. The risks of surgery on the forehead, for example, include unfavorable scarring, bleeding, infection, blood clots, facial nerve injury, numbness and intense itching, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Adverse side effects among the patients in the current five-year study included skin numbness (two patients), hyper- or hyposensitivity (four patients) and mild neck weakness or stiffness (three patients), along with 20 patients who reported occasional itching.

According to statistics from the American Migraine Foundation, 36 million Americans have migraine headaches. Statistics show that 3 percent of the population is shown to have chronic migraines, which must be present for 15 days a month for the minimum of six months, in order to be considered chronic migraines.

Neurologist Dr. Jack Schim, of the Headache Center of Southern California, explained that patients with chronic migraines often suffer from terrible headaches, and are desperate for relief. According to Schim, chronic migraines can be disruptive to a person’s lifestyle, and they can play a role in his or her quality of life.

However, Schim believes facial surgery should only be used as a last resort, and not as a first line of treatment for migraines. “The data needs to be replicated,” said Schim. “It seems like an extreme measure.”

Schim noted that other treatment measures, such as taking multiple oral medicines and getting nerve blocks, may be helpful before turning to surgery. Additionally, Schim also uses Botox treatment for his patients.

“Seventy to 75 percent of patients get a good improvement or full resolution of headaches from Botox,” said Schim, in reference to his practice.

“If someone has tried everything, including avoiding medicine overuse, and addressed their lifestyle issues that could help or hinder headache problems, I would talk to the patient [about this] as an option,” said Schim.

In October, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Botox as an acceptable measure of treatment for chronic migraines.

By Stacy Lipson
HealthDay Reporter

More information

Find out more about migraines at the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCES: Bahman Guyuron, M.D., chairman, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Hospital’s Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio; Jack Schim, M.D., co-director and neurologist, The Headache Center of Southern California; February 2011 Plastic and Reconstructive Journal Surgery

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Content Provided by HealthDay

Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold Formula

What is Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold Formula?

Aspirin is in a group of drugs called salicylates (sa-LIS-il-ates). It works by reducing substances in the body that cause pain, fever, and inflammation.

Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine that reduces the natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose.

Phenylephrine is a decongestant that shrinks blood vessels in the nasal passages. Dilated blood vessels can cause nasal congestion (stuffy nose).

The combination of aspirin, chlorpheniramine, and phenylephrine is used to treat symptoms of the common cold including sneezing, runny or stuffy nose, sore throat, headache, fever, and minor aches and pains.

Aspirin, chlorpheniramine, and phenylephrine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold Formula?

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 2 years old. Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

Aspirin should not be given to a child or teenager who has a fever, especially if the child also has flu symptoms or chicken pox. Aspirin can cause a serious and sometimes fatal condition called Reye’s syndrome in children.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold Formula?

Do not use this medication if you have taken an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. Serious, life threatening side effects can occur if you use a cold medicine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to aspirin, chlorpheniramine, or phenylephrine; or if you have:

  • a recent history of stomach or intestinal bleeding
  • a bleeding disorder such as hemophilia; or
  • if you are unable to urinate

Ask a doctor or pharmacist about using aspirin, chlorpheniramine, and phenylephrine if you have:

  • kidney disease
  • liver disease
  • heart disease, high blood pressure
  • heartburn, stomach pain, indigestion, ulcer, or other stomach problems
  • enlarged prostate, urination problems
  • diabetes
  • glaucoma
  • asthma, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis
  • a thyroid disorder
  • asthma or seasonal allergies; or
  • if you are on a low-salt diet

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether aspirin, chlorpheniramine, and phenylephrine is harmful to an unborn baby. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

Aspirin may be harmful to an unborn baby’s heart, and may also reduce birth weight or have other dangerous effects. Do not take any medication that contains aspirin during the last 3 months of pregnancy without your doctor’s advice.

It is not known whether aspirin, chlorpheniramine, and phenylephrine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Older adults may be more likely to have side effects from this medicine.

Aspirin should not be given to a child or teenager who has a fever, especially if the child also has flu symptoms or chicken pox. Aspirin can cause a serious and sometimes fatal condition called Reye’s syndrome in children.

Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold Formula Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold Formula?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • black, bloody, or tarry stools
  • coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • redness or swelling
  • new cold or flu symptoms
  • fast or uneven heartbeats
  • feeling light-headed, fainting
  • seizure (convulsions)
  • ringing in your ears, hallucinations (seeing things that are not there); or
  • tremors

Less serious side effects may include:

  • drowsiness
  • feeling restless or excited (especially in children)
  • sleep problems (insomnia); or
  • heartburn, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold Formula Interactions

What other drugs affect Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold Formula?

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by chlorpheniramine.

Tell your doctor if you are taking an antidepressant such as citalopram (Celexa), duloxetine (Cymbalta), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Symbyax), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), or venlafaxine (Effexor). Taking any of these drugs with aspirin may cause you to bruise or bleed easily.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

  • a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin)
  • gout medication such as probenecid (Benemid)
  • diabetes medication you take by mouth
  • a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or
  • another salicylate such as choline salicylate and/or magnesium salicylate (Magan, Doan’s, Bayer Select Backache Pain Formula, Mobidin, Arthropan, Trilisate, Tricosal), or salsalate (Disalcid)

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with aspirin, chlorpheniramine, and phenylephrine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold Formula?

This medication can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of aspirin, chlorpheniramine, and phenylephrine.

Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by chlorpheniramine.

Avoid using other medicines that may cause restlessness (such as caffeine, stimulants, diet pills, and decongestants contained in over-the-counter cold medicines). They can add to the stimulant effects of phenylephrine.

Do not use any other over-the-counter medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. Aspirin, antihistamines, and decongestants are contained in many medicines available over the counter. If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much of a certain drug. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains aspirin, an antihistamine, or a decongestant.

Avoid taking an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) while you are taking aspirin. NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), diclofenac (Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others.

Avoid drinking alcohol while you are taking aspirin. Alcohol may increase your risk of stomach bleeding.

Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold Formula Dosage

How should I take Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold Formula?

Use this medication as directed on the label, or as your doctor has prescribed. Do not use the medication in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 2 years old. Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

Dissolve the effervescent tablet in a glass of water and drink it right away. Do not chew or swallow the tablet whole.

Contact your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse, especially if you have:

  • a sore throat that lasts longer than 2 days
  • a sore throat with a fever and headache, nausea, vomiting, or skin rash; or
  • a cough, stuffy nose, and pain that lasts longer than 7 days

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time if you are taking medicine that contains aspirin. You may need to stop taking the medicine for a short time.

Store aspirin, chlorpheniramine, and phenylephrine at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I overdose on Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold Formula?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include ringing in your ears, headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, confusion, feeling restless of excited, hallucinations, rapid breathing, fever, and seizure (convulsions).

What happens if I miss a dose of Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold Formula?

Since cold medicine is often used as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are using the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and wait until your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Symptoms of Sinusitis

Sinusitis is inflammation of the paranasal sinuses, which may be due to infection, allergy or autoimmune issues. Most cases are due to a viral infection and resolve over the course of 10 days. It is a common condition with more than 24 million cases occurring in the United States annually.

What are some symptoms of acute sinusitis?

The location of your sinus pain depends on which sinus is affected.

* Headache when you wake up in the morning is typical of a sinus problem.
* Pain when your forehead over the frontal sinuses is touched may indicate that your frontal sinuses are inflammed.
* Infection in the maxillary sinuses can cause your upper jaw and teeth to ache and your cheeks to become tender to the touch.
* Since the ethmoid sinuses are near the tear ducts in the corner of the eyes, inflammation of these cavities often causes swelling of the eyelids and tissues around your eyes, and pain between your eyes. Ethmoid inflammation also can cause tenderness when the sides of your nose are touched, a loss of smell, and a stuffy nose.
* Although the sphenoid sinuses are less frequently affected, infection in this area can cause earaches, neck pain, and deep aching at the top of your head.

Most people with sinusitis, however, have pain or tenderness in several locations, and their symptoms usually do not clearly indicate which sinuses are inflamed.

Other symptoms can include:

*
* Weakness
* Tiredness
* A cough that may be more severe at night
* Runny nose (rhinitis) or nasal congestion

In addition, the drainage of mucus from the sphenoids or other sinuses down the back of your throat (postnasal drip) can cause you to have a sore throat. Mucus drainage also can irritate the membranes lining your larynx (upper windpipe). Not everyone with these symptoms, however, has sinusitis.

On rare occasions, acute sinusitis can result in brain infection and other serious complications.

How to treat Malaria

Malaria is caused by a parasite called Plasmodium, which is transmitted via the bites of infected mosquitoes. In the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells.

Malaria is a main cause of death worldwide. Approximately 300 million people worldwide are affected by malaria and between 1 and 1.5 million people die from it every year, but it is almost wiped out in the United States. The disease is frequently a problem in developing countries with warm climates. If you travel to these countries, you are at risk. People get malaria by being bitten by an infective female Anopheles mosquito. Malaria is a disease which can be transmitted to people of all ages. It is caused by parasites of the species Plasmodium that are spread from person to person through the bites of infected mosquitoes. Malaria is a parasitic disease that involves infection of the red blood cells. Of the four types of malaria, the most serious type is falciparum malaria, which can be life-threatening. The other three types of malaria (vivax, malariae, and ovale) are generally less serious and are not life-threatening. The scientific name of the particular type of mosquito is Anopheles. An infected Anopheles mosquito bites a person and injects the malaria parasites into the blood. The malaria parasites then travel through the bloodstream to the liver and eventually infect the red blood cells.

Medical treatment should be sought immediately. The effectiveness of ant malarial drugs differs with different species of the parasite and with different stages of the parasite’s life cycle. Your physician will determine the treatment planmost appropriate for your individual condition. Drugs includes chloroquine, mefloquine, primaquine, quinine, pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine (Fansidar), and doxycycline. Some plasmodium has developed resistance to certain medications, and therefore, alternative medications will be prescribed for you.

Symptoms of malaria include fever, headache, and vomiting, and usually appear between 10 and 15 days after the mosquito bite. If not treated, malaria can quickly become life-threatening by disrupting the blood supply to vital organs. In many parts of the world, the parasites have developed resistance to a number of malaria medicines.

Treatment of Malaria:

• If evidence of life-threatening hemolytic anemia is determined, establish large-bore intravenous (IV) lines, initiate fluid resuscitation, and administer transfusion of type-specific packed RBCs.

• P.falciparum based infection can be treated with the drug quinine (orally in mild cases or by intravenous infusion in more severe cases).

• Search for any signs of microvascular malarial complications.

• In cases of marlarial drug resistance, mefloquine, artemisinin derivatives and malarone can be used.

Prevention of malaria what is practiced in epidemic areas is by spraying insecticides like DDT. Many new drugs are available for malaria, however most of the drugs are derived from Quinine derivatives. Malaria often requires treatment with medicine (antimalarial medications). Most of the time antimalarial medications effectively treat the infection; however, some malaria parasites may survive because they are in the liver or are resistant to the medication.

Advil Pediatric (Ibuprofen)

What is Advil Pediatric (Ibuprofen)?

Ibuprofen is in a group of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Ibuprofen works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Ibuprofen is used to reduce fever and treat pain or inflammation caused by many conditions such as headache, toothache, back pain, arthritis, menstrual cramps, or minor injury.

Ibuprofen may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Advil Pediatric (Ibuprofen)?

This medicine can increase your risk of life-threatening heart or circulation problems, including heart attack or stroke. This risk will increase the longer you use ibuprofen. Do not use this medicine just before or after having heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Seek emergency medical help if you have symptoms of heart or circulation problems, such as chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, slurred speech, or problems with vision or balance.

This medicine can also increase your risk of serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole).

Call your doctor at once if you have symptoms of bleeding in your stomach or intestines. This includes black, bloody, or tarry stools, or coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of ibuprofen can cause damage to your stomach or intestines. Use only the smallest amount of ibuprofen needed to get relief from your pain, swelling, or fever.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Advil Pediatric (Ibuprofen)?

NSAIDs can increase your risk of life-threatening heart or circulation problems, including heart attack or stroke. This risk will increase the longer you take ibuprofen. Do not use this medicine just before or after having heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

NSAIDs can also increase your risk of serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole). These conditions can be fatal and gastrointestinal effects can occur without warning at any time while you are taking an NSAID.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to ibuprofen, aspirin or other NSAIDs.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medication if you have:

  • a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot
  • heart disease, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure
  • a history of stomach ulcers or bleeding
  • asthma
  • polyps in your nose
  • liver or kidney disease
  • systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder; or
  • if you smoke

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether ibuprofen is harmful to an unborn baby. However, taking ibuprofen during the last 3 months of pregnancy may result in birth defects. Do not take ibuprofen during pregnancy unless your doctor has told you to.

It is not known whether ibuprofen passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Do not give this medicine to a child without the advice of a doctor.

Advil Pediatric Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Advil Pediatric (Ibuprofen)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop taking ibuprofen and seek medical attention or call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance
  • black, bloody, or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • swelling or rapid weight gain
  • urinating less than usual or not at all
  • nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes)
  • fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash
  • bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness; or
  • severe headache, neck stiffness, chills, increased sensitivity to light, and/or seizure (convulsions)

Less serious side effects may include:

  • upset stomach, mild heartburn, diarrhea, constipation
  • bloating, gas
  • dizziness, headache, nervousness
  • skin itching or rash
  • blurred vision; or
  • ringing in your ears

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Advil Pediatric Interactions

What other drugs affect Advil Pediatric (Ibuprofen)?

Tell your doctor if you are taking an antidepressant such as citalopram (Celexa), duloxetine (Cymbalta), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Symbyax), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), or venlafaxine (Effexor). Taking any of these drugs with ibuprofen may cause you to bruise or bleed easily.

Before taking ibuprofen, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs:

  • aspirin or other NSAIDs such as diclofenac (Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others
  • an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), and others
  • lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid)
  • diuretics (water pills) such as furosemide (Lasix)
  • methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall)
  • steroids (prednisone and others); or
  • a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin)

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with ibuprofen. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Advil Pediatric (Ibuprofen)?

Avoid taking ibuprofen if you are taking aspirin to prevent stroke or heart attack. Ibuprofen can make aspirin less effective in protecting your heart and blood vessels. If you must use both medications, take the ibuprofen at least 8 hours before or 30 minutes after you take the aspirin (non-enteric coated form).

Do not use any other over-the-counter cold, allergy, or pain medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. Many medicines available over the counter contain aspirin or other medicines similar to ibuprofen (such as ketoprofen or naproxen). If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much of this type of medication. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains aspirin, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, or naproxen.

Do not drink alcohol while taking ibuprofen. Alcohol can increase the risk of stomach bleeding caused by ibuprofen.

Advil Pediatric Dosage

How should I take Advil Pediatric (Ibuprofen)?

Take this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended.

Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of ibuprofen can cause damage to your stomach or intestines. The maximum amount of ibuprofen for adults is 800 milligrams per dose or 3200 mg per day (4 maximum doses). Use only the smallest amount of ibuprofen needed to get relief from your pain, swelling, or fever.

Take ibuprofen with food or milk to lessen stomach upset.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. To be sure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

The ibuprofen chewable tablet must be chewed before you swallow it.

If you take ibuprofen for a long period of time, your doctor may want to check you on a regular basis to make sure this medication is not causing harmful effects. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Store ibuprofen at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not allow the liquid medicine to freeze.

What happens if I overdose on Advil Pediatric (Ibuprofen)?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, drowsiness, black or bloody stools, coughing up blood, shallow breathing, fainting, or coma.

What happens if I miss a dose of Advil Pediatric (Ibuprofen)?

Since ibuprofen is sometimes taken as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are taking the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and wait until your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Advil Multi-Symptom Cold (Chlorpheniramine/Ibuprofen/Pseudoephedrine)

What is Advil Multi-Symptom Cold (Chlorpheniramine/Ibuprofen/Pseudoephedrine)?

Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine that reduces the natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose.

Ibuprofen is in a group of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Ibuprofen works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Pseudoephedrine is a decongestant that shrinks blood vessels in the nasal passages. Dilated blood vessels can cause nasal congestion (stuffy nose).

The combination of chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine is used to treat sneezing, itching, watery eyes, runny nose, stuffy nose, sinus congestion, headache, and pain or fever caused by allergies or the common cold.

Chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Advil Multi-Symptom Cold (Chlorpheniramine/Ibuprofen/Pseudoephedrine)?

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 12 years old. Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

Do not use chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days.

Ibuprofen can increase your risk of life-threatening heart or circulation problems, including heart attack or stroke. Do not use this medicine just before or after having heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Seek emergency medical help if you have symptoms of heart or circulation problems, such as chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, slurred speech, or problems with vision or balance.

Ibuprofen can also increase your risk of serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole). These conditions can be fatal and can occur without warning at any time while you are taking ibuprofen. Ibuprofen may be more likely to cause stomach bleeding in adults who are 60 or older.

Call your doctor at once if you have symptoms of bleeding in your stomach or intestines. This includes worsening stomach pain, black, bloody, or tarry stools, or coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to ibuprofen or pseudoephedrine, or if you have a stomach ulcer or active bleeding in your stomach or intestines, polyps in your nose, or a history of allergic reaction to aspirin or other NSAIDs.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Advil Multi-Symptom Cold (Chlorpheniramine/Ibuprofen/Pseudoephedrine)?

Do not use chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to ibuprofen or pseudoephedrine, or if you have:

  • a stomach ulcer or active bleeding in your stomach or intestines
  • polyps in your nose; or
  • a history of allergic reaction to aspirin or other NSAIDs

If you have certain conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use this medication. Before you take this medication, tell your doctor if you have:

  • asthma, emphysema, bronchitis, or if you smoke
  • a history of stomach problems, including heartburn, indigestion, stomach pain, and ulcers or bleeding
  • heart disease, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure
  • systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
  • liver or kidney disease
  • a thyroid disorder
  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder
  • glaucoma
  • diabetes
  • enlarged prostate or problems with urination; or
  • if you smoke

Taking an NSAID can increase your risk of life-threatening heart or circulation problems, including heart attack or stroke. This risk will increase the longer you use an NSAID. Do not use this medicine just before or after having heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

NSAIDs can also increase your risk of serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole). These conditions can be fatal and gastrointestinal effects can occur without warning at any time while you are taking an NSAID. Older adults may have an even greater risk of these serious gastrointestinal side effects.

This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Taking ibuprofen during the last 3 months of pregnancy may result in birth defects and prolonged labor and delivery. Do not take chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine during the last 3 months of pregnancy unless your doctor has told you to.

Chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Ibuprofen may be more likely to cause stomach bleeding in adults who are 60 or older.

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 12 years old. Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

Advil Multi-Symptom Cold Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Advil Multi-Symptom Cold (Chlorpheniramine/Ibuprofen/Pseudoephedrine)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives or blistering skin rash; wheezing or trouble breathing; faint; or swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop taking this medication seek medical attention or call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance
  • worsening stomach pain, black, bloody, or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • fast, pounding, or uneven heartbeat
  • redness or swelling
  • severe dizziness, trouble sleeping, or nervousness
  • easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness, fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms
  • dangerously high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your ears, anxiety, confusion, chest pain, shortness of breath, uneven heartbeats, seizure)
  • urinating less than usual or not at all
  • skin rash, bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness; or
  • fever, headache, neck stiffness, chills, increased sensitivity to light, purple spots on the skin, and/or seizure (convulsions)

Less serious side effects may include:

  • upset stomach, nausea, heartburn, diarrhea, constipation
  • bloating, gas, loss of appetite
  • warmth, tingling, or redness under your skin
  • dizziness, headache, feeling excited or restless
  • skin itching or rash; or
  • ringing in your ears

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Advil Multi-Symptom Cold Interactions

What other drugs affect Advil Multi-Symptom Cold (Chlorpheniramine/Ibuprofen/Pseudoephedrine)?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as other cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by chlorpheniramine.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

  • a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin)
  • steroids (prednisone and others)
  • a diuretic (water pill), or medicine to treat high blood pressure
  • aspirin to prevent stroke or heart attack (ibuprofen can make aspirin less effective in protecting your heart and blood vessels)
  • a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), and others
  • antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others; or
  • other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as diclofenac (Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Advil Multi-Symptom Cold (Chlorpheniramine/Ibuprofen/Pseudoephedrine)?

This medication can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Avoid drinking alcohol while taking this medication. If you drink more than 3 alcoholic beverages a day, ibuprofen may increase your risk of stomach bleeding.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather.

Avoid taking this medication with diet pills, caffeine pills, or other stimulants (such as ADHD medications) without your doctor’s advice. Taking a stimulant together with a decongestant can increase your risk of unpleasant side effects.

Do not use any other over-the-counter cough, cold, or pain medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. Chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine are contained in many medicines available over the counter. If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much of either medication. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains an antihistamine, decongestant, or pain reliever.

Advil Multi-Symptom Cold Dosage

How should I take Advil Multi-Symptom Cold (Chlorpheniramine/Ibuprofen/Pseudoephedrine)?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended. Cold medicine is usually taken only for a short time until your symptoms clear up.

Take this medicine with food or milk if it upsets your stomach.

Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of ibuprofen can cause damage to your stomach or intestines. The maximum amount of ibuprofen for adults is 800 milligrams per dose or 3200 mg per day (4 maximum doses). Use only the smallest amount of chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine needed to get relief from your cold or allergy symptoms.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. To be sure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Call your doctor if you have any new symptoms, or if you have a fever lasting longer than 3 days, stuffy nose lasting longer than 7 days, or pain lasting longer than 10 days. Do not take this medication for longer than 10 days without your doctor’s advice.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time if you have taken a cold medicine within the past few days.

This medication can cause you to have unusual results with allergy skin tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are taking an antihistamine.

Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I overdose on Advil Multi-Symptom Cold (Chlorpheniramine/Ibuprofen/Pseudoephedrine)?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Overdose may cause nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, dizziness, feeling restless or nervous, blurred vision, sweating, breathing problems, or seizure (convulsions).

What happens if I miss a dose of Advil Multi-Symptom Cold (Chlorpheniramine/Ibuprofen/Pseudoephedrine)?

Since cold medicine is usually taken only as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are taking the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Advil Migraine (Ibuprofen)

What is Advil Migraine (Ibuprofen)?

Ibuprofen is in a group of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Ibuprofen works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Ibuprofen is used to reduce fever and treat pain or inflammation caused by many conditions such as headache, toothache, back pain, arthritis, menstrual cramps, or minor injury.

Ibuprofen may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Advil Migraine (Ibuprofen)?

This medicine can increase your risk of life-threatening heart or circulation problems, including heart attack or stroke. This risk will increase the longer you use ibuprofen. Do not use this medicine just before or after having heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Seek emergency medical help if you have symptoms of heart or circulation problems, such as chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, slurred speech, or problems with vision or balance.

This medicine can also increase your risk of serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole).

Call your doctor at once if you have symptoms of bleeding in your stomach or intestines. This includes black, bloody, or tarry stools, or coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of ibuprofen can cause damage to your stomach or intestines. Use only the smallest amount of ibuprofen needed to get relief from your pain, swelling, or fever.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Advil Migraine (Ibuprofen)?

NSAIDs can increase your risk of life-threatening heart or circulation problems, including heart attack or stroke. This risk will increase the longer you take ibuprofen. Do not use this medicine just before or after having heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

NSAIDs can also increase your risk of serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole). These conditions can be fatal and gastrointestinal effects can occur without warning at any time while you are taking an NSAID.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to ibuprofen, aspirin or other NSAIDs.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medication if you have:

  • a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot
  • heart disease, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure
  • a history of stomach ulcers or bleeding
  • asthma
  • polyps in your nose
  • liver or kidney disease
  • systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder; or
  • if you smoke

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether ibuprofen is harmful to an unborn baby. However, taking ibuprofen during the last 3 months of pregnancy may result in birth defects. Do not take ibuprofen during pregnancy unless your doctor has told you to.

It is not known whether ibuprofen passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Do not give this medicine to a child without the advice of a doctor.

Advil Migraine Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Advil Migraine (Ibuprofen)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop taking ibuprofen and seek medical attention or call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance
  • black, bloody, or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • swelling or rapid weight gain
  • urinating less than usual or not at all
  • nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes)
  • fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash
  • bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness; or
  • severe headache, neck stiffness, chills, increased sensitivity to light, and/or seizure (convulsions)

Less serious side effects may include:

  • upset stomach, mild heartburn, diarrhea, constipation
  • bloating, gas
  • dizziness, headache, nervousness
  • skin itching or rash
  • blurred vision; or
  • ringing in your ears

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Advil Migraine Interactions

What other drugs affect Advil Migraine (Ibuprofen)?

Tell your doctor if you are taking an antidepressant such as citalopram (Celexa), duloxetine (Cymbalta), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Symbyax), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), or venlafaxine (Effexor). Taking any of these drugs with ibuprofen may cause you to bruise or bleed easily.

Before taking ibuprofen, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs:

  • aspirin or other NSAIDs such as diclofenac (Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others
  • an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), and others
  • lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid)
  • diuretics (water pills) such as furosemide (Lasix)
  • methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall)
  • steroids (prednisone and others); or
  • a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin)

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with ibuprofen. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Advil Migraine (Ibuprofen)?

Avoid taking ibuprofen if you are taking aspirin to prevent stroke or heart attack. Ibuprofen can make aspirin less effective in protecting your heart and blood vessels. If you must use both medications, take the ibuprofen at least 8 hours before or 30 minutes after you take the aspirin (non-enteric coated form).

Do not use any other over-the-counter cold, allergy, or pain medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. Many medicines available over the counter contain aspirin or other medicines similar to ibuprofen (such as ketoprofen or naproxen). If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much of this type of medication. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains aspirin, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, or naproxen.

Do not drink alcohol while taking ibuprofen. Alcohol can increase the risk of stomach bleeding caused by ibuprofen.

Advil Migraine Dosage

How should I take Advil Migraine (Ibuprofen)?

Take this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended.

Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of ibuprofen can cause damage to your stomach or intestines. The maximum amount of ibuprofen for adults is 800 milligrams per dose or 3200 mg per day (4 maximum doses). Use only the smallest amount of ibuprofen needed to get relief from your pain, swelling, or fever.

Take ibuprofen with food or milk to lessen stomach upset.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. To be sure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

The ibuprofen chewable tablet must be chewed before you swallow it.

If you take ibuprofen for a long period of time, your doctor may want to check you on a regular basis to make sure this medication is not causing harmful effects. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Store ibuprofen at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not allow the liquid medicine to freeze.

What happens if I overdose on Advil Migraine (Ibuprofen)?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, drowsiness, black or bloody stools, coughing up blood, shallow breathing, fainting, or coma.

What happens if I miss a dose of Advil Migraine (Ibuprofen)?

Since ibuprofen is sometimes taken as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are taking the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and wait until your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Advil Liquigel (Ibuprofen)

What is Advil Liquigel (Ibuprofen)?

Ibuprofen is in a group of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Ibuprofen works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Ibuprofen is used to reduce fever and treat pain or inflammation caused by many conditions such as headache, toothache, back pain, arthritis, menstrual cramps, or minor injury.

Ibuprofen may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Advil Liquigel (Ibuprofen)?

This medicine can increase your risk of life-threatening heart or circulation problems, including heart attack or stroke. This risk will increase the longer you use ibuprofen. Do not use this medicine just before or after having heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Seek emergency medical help if you have symptoms of heart or circulation problems, such as chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, slurred speech, or problems with vision or balance.

This medicine can also increase your risk of serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole).

Call your doctor at once if you have symptoms of bleeding in your stomach or intestines. This includes black, bloody, or tarry stools, or coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of ibuprofen can cause damage to your stomach or intestines. Use only the smallest amount of ibuprofen needed to get relief from your pain, swelling, or fever.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Advil Liquigel (Ibuprofen)?

NSAIDs can increase your risk of life-threatening heart or circulation problems, including heart attack or stroke. This risk will increase the longer you take ibuprofen. Do not use this medicine just before or after having heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

NSAIDs can also increase your risk of serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole). These conditions can be fatal and gastrointestinal effects can occur without warning at any time while you are taking an NSAID.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to ibuprofen, aspirin or other NSAIDs.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medication if you have:

  • a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot
  • heart disease, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure
  • a history of stomach ulcers or bleeding
  • asthma
  • polyps in your nose
  • liver or kidney disease
  • systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder; or
  • if you smoke

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether ibuprofen is harmful to an unborn baby. However, taking ibuprofen during the last 3 months of pregnancy may result in birth defects. Do not take ibuprofen during pregnancy unless your doctor has told you to.

It is not known whether ibuprofen passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Do not give this medicine to a child without the advice of a doctor.

Advil Liquigel Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Advil Liquigel (Ibuprofen)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop taking ibuprofen and seek medical attention or call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance
  • black, bloody, or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • swelling or rapid weight gain
  • urinating less than usual or not at all
  • nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes)
  • fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash
  • bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness; or
  • severe headache, neck stiffness, chills, increased sensitivity to light, and/or seizure (convulsions)

Less serious side effects may include:

  • upset stomach, mild heartburn, diarrhea, constipation
  • bloating, gas
  • dizziness, headache, nervousness
  • skin itching or rash
  • blurred vision; or
  • ringing in your ears

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Advil Liquigel Interactions

What other drugs affect Advil Liquigel (Ibuprofen)?

Tell your doctor if you are taking an antidepressant such as citalopram (Celexa), duloxetine (Cymbalta), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Symbyax), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), or venlafaxine (Effexor). Taking any of these drugs with ibuprofen may cause you to bruise or bleed easily.

Before taking ibuprofen, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs:

  • aspirin or other NSAIDs such as diclofenac (Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others
  • an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), and others
  • lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid)
  • diuretics (water pills) such as furosemide (Lasix)
  • methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall)
  • steroids (prednisone and others); or
  • a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin)

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with ibuprofen. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Advil Liquigel (Ibuprofen)?

Avoid taking ibuprofen if you are taking aspirin to prevent stroke or heart attack. Ibuprofen can make aspirin less effective in protecting your heart and blood vessels. If you must use both medications, take the ibuprofen at least 8 hours before or 30 minutes after you take the aspirin (non-enteric coated form).

Do not use any other over-the-counter cold, allergy, or pain medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. Many medicines available over the counter contain aspirin or other medicines similar to ibuprofen (such as ketoprofen or naproxen). If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much of this type of medication. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains aspirin, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, or naproxen.

Do not drink alcohol while taking ibuprofen. Alcohol can increase the risk of stomach bleeding caused by ibuprofen.

Advil Liquigel Dosage

How should I take Advil Liquigel (Ibuprofen)?

Take this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended.

Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of ibuprofen can cause damage to your stomach or intestines. The maximum amount of ibuprofen for adults is 800 milligrams per dose or 3200 mg per day (4 maximum doses). Use only the smallest amount of ibuprofen needed to get relief from your pain, swelling, or fever.

Take ibuprofen with food or milk to lessen stomach upset.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. To be sure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

The ibuprofen chewable tablet must be chewed before you swallow it.

If you take ibuprofen for a long period of time, your doctor may want to check you on a regular basis to make sure this medication is not causing harmful effects. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Store ibuprofen at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not allow the liquid medicine to freeze.

What happens if I overdose on Advil Liquigel (Ibuprofen)?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, drowsiness, black or bloody stools, coughing up blood, shallow breathing, fainting, or coma.

What happens if I miss a dose of Advil Liquigel (Ibuprofen)?

Since ibuprofen is sometimes taken as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are taking the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and wait until your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com