Allergies Linked to Lower Brain Cancer Rate in Study

MONDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) — If you suffer from allergies, take heart: Researchers say you may be less likely to develop a tough-to-treat brain cancer, possibly because your immune system is on high alert.

Overactive immune system may target tumors known as gliomas, researchers say.

It’s not clear how this knowledge might improve prevention or treatment of brain cancer, but the study’s lead author said the findings pave the way for further research.

“We need to do more studies to really get at that underlying mechanism. Then we might be able to do things that would influence people who might have a higher risk or may have a family history,” said Bridget J. McCarthy, a research associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

The lesions studied are known as gliomas, the most common type of adult brain tumor. They account for more than half of the 18,000-plus malignant brain tumors diagnosed in the United States every year, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

Gliomas — which led to the death of Sen. Edward Kennedy — often cause death within months, despite surgery or treatment with chemotherapy or radiation.

Researchers have published conflicting studies about whether people with allergies and autoimmune disorders (which cause the immune system to attack the body) have a lower risk of developing the tumors, McCarthy said. “We wanted to look at the spectrum and see if we found the association with any type of allergy,” McCarthy explained.

In the study, published Feb. 7 in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, McCarthy and colleagues examined surveys filled out by 419 patients with gliomas and 612 cancer-free patients from North Carolina and Illinois. All of the patients were asked if they had doctor-diagnosed allergies — seasonal, medication, food, pet or any other — and whether they took antihistamines.

The researchers found that patients with both high- and low-grade tumors were more likely to report no allergies than the other patients. And the more allergies someone had, the lower their odds of having gliomas. Antihistamine use didn’t affect the results, the authors said.

However, the study didn’t specify exactly how much more likely it is that an allergy-free person will develop a glioma compared to someone who has allergies.

What might allergies — or the lack of them — have to do with brain tumors? McCarthy said overactive immune systems may cause allergies and also allow people to fight off cancer. Figuring out what to do about this is the tough question.

“Obviously, it’s not like allergies are a modifiable risk factor,” she said. “You can’t tell people to go out and develop allergies. That’s not going to happen. And you can’t tell people with allergies that, ‘You’re doing a good thing, and don’t try to get rid of them.'”

The study doesn’t prove a cause and effect — that allergies directly lower the risk of brain tumor. It only shows a possible connection, one that doesn’t sway Dr. Eugene S. Flamm, chairman of the department of neurosurgery at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City.

Flamm said the study is small and draws conclusions “far beyond the observational data.”

“As the authors point out, there are several conflicting reports in the literature, and this paper does not resolve the issue in any way,” Flamm said.

One reason for the conflicting reports, the authors said, was that “allergy” was defined differently in various studies — sometimes broadly and sometimes narrowly, as in seasonal allergies alone. Further studies are essential, they said.

By Randy Dotinga
HealthDay Reporter

More information

For more about brain cancer, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCES: Bridget J. McCarthy, Ph.D., research associate professor of epidemiology, University of Illinois at Chicago; Eugene S. Flamm, M.D., Jeffrey P. Bergstein Professor and chairman, department of neurological surgery, Montefiore Medical Center, New York City; February 2011, Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Content Provided by HealthDay

Teens With Food Allergies May Feel Unsafe at School

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) — Children and teens with potentially life-threatening food allergies may feel unsafe, isolated and excluded in their schools, a small study suggests.

Younger children report feeling more confident because of greater supervision, small study finds.

Researchers interviewed 10 children, aged 8 to 12, and 10 teenagers in Canada whose food allergies were severe enough that they had to carry injectable adrenaline in case they suffered an allergic reaction.

Compared to the children, teens felt less confident about their surroundings at high school and the information about food allergies possessed by school personnel and parents.

High schools were viewed as less safe because they didn’t have homerooms, there were unsupervised lunch areas where food fights sometimes break out, and fewer staff who knew about food allergies. Elementary schools were considered safer because there was a stronger parental presence and consistent routines involving lunch rooms, trained staff, and communication strategies.

The children and teens felt the greatest threats to their safety came from uninformed friends, school personnel and the parents of other students. Many also said a number of environmental and social barriers led to them being teased and feeling isolated and excluded.

The children tended to rely on parents and teachers to cope, while the teens often fended for themselves by avoiding risky foods, educating others about food allergies, trying to understand confusing food labels, and quickly leaving unsafe places. Some said they felt disempowered and overburdened and even developed habits such as constant hand washing or delaying eating until they knew there was an adult present who could drive them to the hospital if they suffered an allergic reaction.

The findings, published in the January issue of the journal Risk Analysis, provide information for food-allergic children and their parents to influence school policies about food allergy risk management and coping, said the researchers in a journal news release.

Because of its limited size, the study should merely be considered exploratory, the authors said.

In the United States, as many as 200 young children die annually from serious food allergies, according to the news release.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has more about food allergies.

SOURCE: Risk Analysis, news release, Jan. 26, 2011

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Content Provided by HealthDay

Causes of Headaches When We Wake Up

Headache is a disease that is often felt by anyone and can strike at any time. Some people often experience headaches when they wake up. Some causes of it are temporary or even could be a symptom of a certain medical conditions.

It is really annoying to go to bed feeling perfectly ok but either wake during the night or in the morning with a headache. There may just be a reason!

You wake up your neck is tight; you have a dull pain in the back of your head, or perhaps an uncomfortable feeling in your jaw. You don’t understand it. You felt just fine when you went to sleep.

Sometimes it is easy to pinpoint the problem. You may have been on a flight the day before and you jinked your neck while trying to sleep. Or you may be staying in a hotel with dodgy pillows, which are always too soft or too hard, but never just right.

But many times the source of the problem is not that obvious. However if we dig a little deeper you may see some solutions.

1. Patterns of pain.
Sometimes headaches occur on a time delay basis. It may be that you are stressed out on Tuesday, play some physical sport on Wednesday and become hypoglycaemic on Thursday and then have a headache on Saturday and can’t work out why.

It is a pattern of behavior and events, which in isolation don’t cause you a problem, but the sum of the parts is enough to create a painful response.

Look for your patterns, keep a headache diary, use a spread sheet and stand back and look at the big picture and see what you can find out about yourself.

2. Sinus inflammation
Headaches that occur when you wake up in the morning often is caused by sinus inflammation. The pain due to inflammation of the sinus usually will worsen when you bend forward, thereby increasing the pressure in the sinus cavity. Usually this condition is accompanied by a runny nose or sore throat.

3. Drunk
Being drunk also can give you a headache when you wake up. This is because alcohol makes blood vessels expand, which can trigger headaches.
Symptoms of headache due to hangovers typically include nausea and vomiting, loss of balance, thirst and rapid heartbeat.

If the headache worsens and is equipped with a prolong confusion, continuous vomiting or seizures, you may have alcohol poisoning and require immediate medical attention.

4. Allergies
In most western countries the tradition of giving and consuming large amounts of chocolate Easter eggs is very popular. However the high sugar content and other chemicals specific to chocolate can be a cause of headaches for some people. As the chocolate intake increases over the holiday so too does the likelihood of a headache.

It is basically an allergic reaction. Sugar is a grass. Many people react to various grass varieties. Image now if you concentrate that grass and then eat large amounts of it. Add it to chocolate and you have a potential headache recipe.

Keep track of your chocolate binges and any subsequent headaches. For some people it can become more specific. Some find they react more to chocolate which has been stored at room temperature, than choc which has been refrigerated. Why this is, is a mystery to me but because I routinely question clients, I have found this temperature issue to be real.

Dark chocolate tends to be less reactive as it has less sugar and milk products.

Other allergies will seem to make this chocolate headache problem more likely. Sad but true!

5. Caffeine
The classic caffeine withdrawal which occurs on weekends or holidays when you consume less coffee than you would in your office. The solution is more weekend coffee or less work day coffee. You decide which would make the most sense to you.

6. Irregular sleeping patterns
Chronic headache in the morning seems to occur in people have trouble sleeping.

Several factors can interfere with sleep such as sleep apnea, sleeping near someone who snores, gritted teeth, depression and anxiety.

7. Overdose of headache drugs
Too frequent use headache drugs also can cause headaches in the morning, usually accompanied by nausea. Stopping the dependence on the painkillers is the only way to free yourself from pain.

8. Pregnancy
Headaches in the morning can be a sign of pregnancy, usually accompanied by nausea and vomiting. Some women also experience headaches caused by hormonal changes.

The hormones can trigger an increase in circulation in the bloodstream that leads to headaches. Pregnancy headaches can strike at any time, but also accompanied by other classic symptoms of morning sickness.

AlleRx PE Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pe)

What is AlleRx PE Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pe)?

Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine that reduces the natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose.

Methscopolamine is an anticholinergic (an-tye-kol-in-URJ-ik) that has a drying effect on the nasal passages.

Phenylephrine is a decongestant that shrinks blood vessels in the nasal passages. Dilated blood vessels can cause nasal congestion (stuffy nose).

The combination of chlorpheniramine, methscopolamine, and phenylephrine is used to treat runny nose, sneezing, itchy throat, watery eyes, and sinus congestion caused by allergies, the common cold, or the flu.

Chlorpheniramine, methscopolamine, and phenylephrine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about AlleRx PE Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pe)?

Do not use this medicine if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take cold or allergy medicine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

Before using this medicine, tell your doctor if you have heart disease, high blood pressure, or a heart rhythm disorder, circulation problems, glaucoma, diabetes, a thyroid disorder, kidney disease, or problems with urination.

Do not use any other over-the-counter cold, cough, or allergy medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much of a certain drug. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains chlorpheniramine or phenylephrine.

Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 5 days of treatment, or if you have a fever with a headache, cough, or skin rash.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking AlleRx PE Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pe)?

Do not take this medication if you are allergic to chlorpheniramine, methscopolamine, phenylephrine, or to other cold or allergy medicines, diet pills, stimulants, or ADHD medications.

Do not use this medicine if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take a cold or allergy medicine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • heart disease, high blood pressure, or a heart rhythm disorder
  • a blood vessel disorder or circulation problems
  • glaucoma
  • diabetes
  • a thyroid disorder
  • kidney disease
  • asthma
  • an enlarged prostate; or
  • problems with urination

This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

This medication can decrease breast milk production, and also may pass into breast milk and could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Artificially-sweetened liquid forms of cold medicine may contain phenylalanine. This would be important to know if you have phenylketonuria (PKU). Check the ingredients and warnings on the medication label if you are concerned about phenylalanine.

AlleRx PE Dose Pack Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of AlleRx PE Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pe)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • fast, pounding, or uneven heartbeat
  • confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior
  • severe dizziness, anxiety, restless feeling, or nervousness
  • urinating less than usual or not at all
  • easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness, fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms
  • increased blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, trouble concentrating, chest pain, numbness, seizure); or
  • nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes)

Less serious side effects may include:

  • blurred vision
  • dry mouth
  • nausea, stomach pain, constipation
  • mild loss of appetite
  • dizziness, drowsiness, headache
  • problems with memory or concentration
  • ringing in your ears
  • restlessness or excitability (especially in children)
  • warmth, tingling, or redness under your skin
  • cold feeling in your hands or feet
  • sleep problems (insomnia); or
  • skin rash or itching

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

AlleRx PE Dose Pack Interactions

What other drugs affect AlleRx PE Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pe)?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are using any other antihistamine or decongestant pills, liquids, or nasal sprays. Also tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

  • pramlintide (Symlin)
  • aspirin or salicylates (such as Disalcid, Doan’s Pills, Dolobid, Salflex, Tricosal, and others)
  • an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon) or desipramine (Norpramin)
  • bladder or urinary medications such as oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol) or tolterodine (Detrol)
  • a diuretic (water pill), or medicines to treat high blood pressure, angina (chest pain), or other heart conditions
  • medication to treat irritable bowel syndrome
  • medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), risperidone (Risperdal), trazodone (Desyrel)
  • migraine headache medication such as sumatriptan (Imitrex), naratriptan (Amerge), zolmitriptan (Zomig), ergotamine (Ergostat, Ergomar); or
  • seizure medication such as carbamazepine (Carbatrol) or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton)

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with chlorpheniramine, methscopolamine, and phenylephrine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking AlleRx PE Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pe)?

This medication can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather.

Cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by chlorpheniramine or methscopolamine. Tell your doctor if you need to use any of these other medicines.

Avoid taking diet pills, caffeine pills, or other stimulants (such as ADHD medications) without your doctor’s advice.

Do not use any other over-the-counter cold, cough, or allergy medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. Chlorpheniramine and phenylephrine are contained in many medicines available over the counter. If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much of a certain drug. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains chlorpheniramine or phenylephrine.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can add to drowsiness caused by an antihistamine.

AlleRx PE Dose Pack Dosage

How should I take AlleRx PE Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pe)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Cold medicine is usually taken for only a short time until your symptoms clear up.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

It is best to take this medicine with food.

Measure the liquid form of this medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one. The suspension liquid form should be shaken well just before you measure a dose.

Do not crush, chew, break, or open an extended-release tablet unless your doctor tells you to. Swallow the pill whole. It is specially made to release medicine slowly in the body. Breaking or opening the pill would cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. However, some extended-release pills can be broken to split the dose. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions.

The chewable tablet must be chewed completely before you swallow it.

Tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 5 days of treatment, or if you have a fever with a headache, cough, or skin rash.

This medication can cause you to have unusual results with allergy skin tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are taking an antihistamine.

Store this medicine at room temperature, away from heat, light, and moisture.

What happens if I overdose on AlleRx PE Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pe)?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Overdose symptoms may include feeling restless or nervous, nausea, vomiting, extreme drowsiness, confusion, hallucinations, uneven heart rate, fainting, or seizure (convulsions).

What happens if I miss a dose of AlleRx PE Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pe)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Allerx Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pse)

What is Allerx Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pse)?

Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine that reduces the natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose.

Methscopolamine reduces the secretions of certain organs in the body.

Pseudoephedrine is a decongestant that shrinks blood vessels in the nasal passages. Dilated blood vessels can cause nasal congestion (stuffy nose).

The combination of chlorpheniramine, methscopolamine, and pseudoephedrine is used to treat symptoms of the common cold or seasonal allergies, including sneezing, runny or stuffy nose, and itchy, watery eyes.

Chlorpheniramine, methscopolamine, and pseudoephedrine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Allerx Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pse)?

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 4 years old. Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

Do not use a cough or cold if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to chlorpheniramine or methscopolamine, or if you have severe high blood pressure or coronary artery disease, narrow-angle glaucoma, a stomach ulcer, or if you are unable to urinate.

Do not use this medication during an asthma attack.

Avoid drinking alcohol while you are taking this medication.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Allerx Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pse)?

Do not use a cough or cold if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Dangerous side effects may occur if you take a cough or cold medicine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to chlorpheniramine, methscopolamine, or pseudoephedrine, or if you have:

  • severe or uncontrolled high blood pressure
  • severe coronary artery disease
  • narrow angle glaucoma
  • a stomach ulcer
  • if you are unable to urinate; or
  • if you are having an asthma attack

Before using chlorpheniramine, methscopolamine, and pseudoephedrine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • kidney disease
  • liver disease
  • diabetes
  • glaucoma
  • heart disease, high blood pressure, or circulation problems
  • overactive thyroid
  • a seizure disorder such as epilepsy
  • asthma, emphysema or chronic bronchitis; or
  • urination problems or an enlarged prostate

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take this medication.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

Chlorpheniramine, methscopolamine, and pseudoephedrine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Allerx Dose Pack Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Allerx Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pse)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • numbness, tingling, or cold feeling in your hands or feet
  • fast, pounding, or uneven heart beats
  • painful or difficult urination
  • confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior
  • feeling short of breath
  • tremors or shaking; or
  • severe drowsiness, feeling light-headed, fainting

Less serious side effects may include:

  • dry mouth, stomach pain, changes in appetite
  • drowsiness, dizziness, weakness, headache
  • dry eyes, blurred vision
  • increased sweating
  • skin rash; or
  • feeling nervous or excited (especially in children)

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Allerx Dose Pack Interactions

What other drugs affect Allerx Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pse)?

Many drugs can interact with chlorpheniramine, methscopolamine, and pseudoephedrine. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using any of these drugs:

  • antacids
  • medicine to treat diarrhea (such as Immodium, Kaopectate, Pepto-Bismol)
  • atropine (Donnatal, and others), benztropine (Cogentin), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm-Scop)
  • bronchodilators such as ipratroprium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva)
  • glycopyrrolate (Robinul)
  • mepenzolate (Cantil)
  • bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare)
  • irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others), or propantheline (Pro-Banthine)
  • a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta, Ziac), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), timolol (Blocadren), and others
  • a barbiturate such as phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or
  • an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), and others

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with chlorpheniramine, methscopolamine, and pseudoephedrine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Allerx Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pse)?

This medication can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Avoid becoming overheated in hot weather. Chlorpheniramine, methscopolamine, and pseudoephedrine increases the risk of heat stroke because it causes decreased sweating and can make you more sensitive to sunlight.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of chlorpheniramine, methscopolamine, and pseudoephedrine.

Narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by chlorpheniramine or methscopolamine. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines, or any other cold or allergy medications.

Allerx Dose Pack Dosage

How should I take Allerx Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pse)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the instructions on your prescription label. Cold medicine is usually taken for only a short time until your symptoms clear up.

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 4 years old. Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow the pill whole. It is specially made to release medicine slowly in the body. Breaking the pill would cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

Contact your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse while using this medication.

This medication can cause you to have unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are taking an antihistamine.

Store chlorpheniramine, methscopolamine, and pseudoephedrine at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I overdose on Allerx Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pse)?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, severe drowsiness, shallow breathing, ringing in your ears, problems with balance or coordination, hallucinations (seeing things), sleep problems (insomnia), feeling restless or excited, blurred vision, tremors, flushed face, and seizure (convulsions).

What happens if I miss a dose of Allerx Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine/Methscopolamine/Pse)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

AlleRx DF Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine Methscopolamine)

What is AlleRx DF Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine Methscopolamine)?

Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine that reduces the natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose.

Methscopolamine reduces the secretions of certain organs in the body.

The combination of chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine is used to treat symptoms of the common cold or seasonal allergies, including sneezing, runny or stuffy nose, and itchy, watery eyes.

Chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about AlleRx DF Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine Methscopolamine)?

Do not use chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Dangerous side effects may occur if you take chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to chlorpheniramine or methscopolamine, or if you have severe high blood pressure or coronary artery disease, narrow-angle glaucoma, a stomach ulcer, or if you are unable to urinate.

Do not use this medication during an asthma attack.

This medication can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Avoid becoming overheated in hot weather. Chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine increases the risk of heat stroke because it causes decreased sweating and can make you more sensitive to sunlight.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine.

Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety), or medicines that may cause restlessness (such as caffeine, stimulants, diet pills, and decongestants contained in over-the-counter cold medicines). They can add to the side effects of chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking AlleRx DF Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine Methscopolamine)?

Do not use chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Dangerous side effects may occur if you take chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to chlorpheniramine or methscopolamine, or if you have:

  • severe or uncontrolled high blood pressure
  • severe coronary artery disease
  • narrow angle glaucoma
  • a stomach ulcer
  • if you are unable to urinate; or
  • if you are having an asthma attack

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • kidney disease
  • liver disease
  • diabetes
  • glaucoma
  • heart disease, high blood pressure, or circulation problems
  • overactive thyroid
  • a seizure disorder such as epilepsy
  • asthma, emphysema or chronic bronchitis; or
  • urination problems or an enlarged prostate

If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

Chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Older adults may be more likely to have side effects from this medicine.

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 6 years old.

AlleRx DF Dose Pack Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of AlleRx DF Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine Methscopolamine)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • problems with balance or coordination
  • severe drowsiness, feeling light-headed, fainting
  • extreme thirst and hot, dry skin
  • breathing problems
  • easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness
  • fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms
  • fast or uneven heart beats
  • tight feeling in your chest
  • seizure (convulsions)
  • hallucinations (seeing things that are not there); or
  • tremors

Continue using this medication and talk with your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects:

  • dry mouth, stomach pain, changes in appetite
  • drowsiness, dizziness, weakness, headache
  • dry eyes, blurred vision
  • painful or difficult urination
  • increased sweating
  • skin rash; or
  • feeling nervous or excited (especially in children)

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

AlleRx DF Dose Pack Interactions

What other drugs affect AlleRx DF Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine Methscopolamine)?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

  • antacids
  • medicine to treat diarrhea (such as Immodium, Kaopectate, Pepto-Bismol)
  • atropine (Donnatal, and others)
  • belladonna
  • clidinium (Quarzan)
  • dicyclomine (Bentyl)
  • glycopyrrolate (Robinul)
  • hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others)
  • mepenzolate (Cantil)
  • methantheline (Provocholine)
  • methscopolamine (Pamine)
  • propantheline (Pro-Banthine); or
  • scopolamine (Transderm-Scop)
  • a beta-blocker such as acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), betaxolol (Kerlone), bisoprolol (Zebeta), carteolol (Cartrol), carvedilol (Coreg), esmolol (Brevibloc), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), penbutolol (Levatol), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), or timolol (Blocadren)
  • a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or
  • antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil)

If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking AlleRx DF Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine Methscopolamine)?

This medication can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Avoid becoming overheated in hot weather. Chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine increases the risk of heat stroke because it causes decreased sweating and can make you more sensitive to sunlight.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine.

Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety), or medicines that may cause restlessness (such as caffeine, stimulants, diet pills, and decongestants contained in over-the-counter cold medicines). They can add to the side effects of chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine.

AlleRx DF Dose Pack Dosage

How should I take AlleRx DF Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine Methscopolamine)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the instructions on your prescription label.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

Do not crush, chew, break, or open an extended-release tablet or capsule. Swallow the pill whole. It is specially made to release medicine slowly in the body. Breaking or opening the pill would cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

The chewable tablet must be chewed before swallowing.

Measure the liquid form of this medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Contact your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse after taking this medicine for 7 days.

This medication can cause you to have unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine. You may need to stop using the medication for a short time before having a medical test.

Store chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I overdose on AlleRx DF Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine Methscopolamine)?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Symptoms of a chlorpheniramine and methscopolamine overdose may include nausea, vomiting, severe drowsiness, shallow breathing, ringing in your ears, problems with balance or coordination, hallucinations (seeing things), sleep problems (insomnia), feeling restless or excited, blurred vision, tremors, flushed face, and seizure (convulsions).

What happens if I miss a dose of AlleRx DF Dose Pack (Chlorpheniramine Methscopolamine)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

AllerTan (Chlorpheniramine/Phenylephrine/Pyrilamine)

What is AllerTan (Chlorpheniramine/Phenylephrine/Pyrilamine)?

Chlorpheniramine and pyrilamine are antihistamines that reduce the natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose.

Phenylephrine is a decongestant that shrinks blood vessels in the nasal passages. Dilated blood vessels can cause nasal congestion (stuffy nose).

The combination of chlorpheniramine, pyrilamine, and phenylephrine is used to treat runny or stuffy nose, sinus congestion, watery eyes, and other symptoms caused by allergies or the common cold or flu.

Chlorpheniramine, pyrilamine, and phenylephrine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about AllerTan (Chlorpheniramine/Phenylephrine/Pyrilamine)?

Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

Do not use any other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or sleep medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much of one or more types of medicine. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains an antihistamine or decongestant.

This medication can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of chlorpheniramine, pyrilamine, and phenylephrine.

Cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by chlorpheniramine, pyrilamine, and phenylephrine. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines, or any other cough and cold medications.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking AllerTan (Chlorpheniramine/Phenylephrine/Pyrilamine)?

Do not that this medication if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take chlorpheniramine, pyrilamine, and phenylephrine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to chlorpheniramine, hydrocodone, or phenylephrine, or to other antihistamines or decongestants.

Before taking chlorpheniramine, pyrilamine, and phenylephrine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • emphysema or chronic bronchitis
  • liver disease
  • kidney disease
  • heart disease or high blood pressure
  • diabetes
  • a thyroid disorder
  • glaucoma
  • enlarged prostate; or
  • urination problems

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take this medication.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether this medication passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

AllerTan Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of AllerTan (Chlorpheniramine/Phenylephrine/Pyrilamine)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • severe dizziness, anxiety, restless feeling, or nervousness
  • fast, pounding, or uneven heartbeats
  • confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior
  • feeling like you might pass out
  • urinating less than usual or not at all
  • easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness, fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms
  • increased blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, trouble concentrating, chest pain, numbness, seizure); or
  • nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes)

Less serious side effects may include:

  • upset stomach, constipation
  • dry mouth
  • blurred vision
  • dizziness, drowsiness
  • problems with memory or concentration
  • sleep problems (insomnia); or
  • restless or excitability (especially in children)

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

AllerTan Interactions

What other drugs affect AllerTan (Chlorpheniramine/Phenylephrine/Pyrilamine)?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

  • blood pressure medication
  • an antidepressant
  • a diuretic (water pill)
  • medication to treat irritable bowel syndrome
  • bladder or urinary medications such as oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol) or tolterodine (Detrol)
  • aspirin or salicylates (such as Disalcid, Doan’s Pills, Dolobid, Salflex, Tricosal, and others); or
  • a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), carteolol (Cartrol), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal), sotalol (Betapace), timolol (Blocadren), and others

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with chlorpheniramine, pyrilamine, and phenylephrine. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking AllerTan (Chlorpheniramine/Phenylephrine/Pyrilamine)?

This medication can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of chlorpheniramine, pyrilamine, and phenylephrine.

Avoid taking diet pills, caffeine pills, or other stimulants (such as ADHD medications) without your doctor’s advice. Taking a stimulant together with a decongestant can increase your risk of unpleasant side effects.

Cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by chlorpheniramine, pyrilamine, and phenylephrine. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines, or any other cough and cold medications.

Do not use any other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or sleep medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much of one or more types of medicine. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains an antihistamine or decongestant.

AllerTan Dosage

How should I take AllerTan (Chlorpheniramine/Phenylephrine/Pyrilamine)?

Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow the pill whole. Breaking or crushing the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Shake the oral suspension liquid medicine well just before you measure a dose.

Store the medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I overdose on AllerTan (Chlorpheniramine/Phenylephrine/Pyrilamine)?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include dry mouth, dilated pupils, nausea, vomiting, and warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin.

What happens if I miss a dose of AllerTan (Chlorpheniramine/Phenylephrine/Pyrilamine)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Allerphed (Pseudoephedrine Triprolidine)

What is Allerphed (Pseudoephedrine Triprolidine)?

Triprolidine is an antihistamine that reduces the natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose.

Pseudoephedrine is a decongestant that shrinks blood vessels in the nasal passages. Dilated blood vessels can cause nasal congestion (stuffy nose).

The combination of pseudoephedrine and triprolidine is used to treat sneezing, cough, runny or stuffy nose, itchy or watery eyes, hives, skin rash, itching, and other symptoms of allergies and the common cold.

Pseudoephedrine and triprolidine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Allerphed (Pseudoephedrine Triprolidine)?

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 2 years old. Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

Do not use any other over-the-counter cold, allergy, or sleep medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much of a certain drug. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains an antihistamine or decongestant.

Do not use a cough or cold medicine if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take cough or cold medicine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

Pseudoephedrine and triprolidine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of this medication.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Allerphed (Pseudoephedrine Triprolidine)?

Do not use a cough or cold medicine if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take cough or cold medicine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take pseudoephedrine and triprolidine if you have:

  • kidney disease
  • diabetes
  • glaucoma
  • heart disease or high blood pressure
  • diabetes
  • a thyroid disorder
  • an enlarged prostate; or
  • problems with urination

This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

Pseudoephedrine and triprolidine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Artificially-sweetened liquid forms of cold medicine may contain phenylalanine. This would be important to know if you have phenylketonuria (PKU). Check the ingredients and warnings on the medication label if you are concerned about phenylalanine.

Allerphed Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Allerphed (Pseudoephedrine Triprolidine)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • fast, pounding, or uneven heartbeat
  • confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior
  • severe dizziness, anxiety, restless feeling, or nervousness
  • increased blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, trouble concentrating, chest pain, numbness, seizure)
  • confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior
  • easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness, fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; or
  • urinating less than usual or not at all

Less serious side effects may include:

  • blurred vision
  • dry mouth
  • nausea, stomach pain, constipation
  • mild loss of appetite, stomach upset
  • warmth, tingling, or redness under your skin
  • sleep problems (insomnia)
  • restless or excitability (especially in children)
  • skin rash or itching
  • dizziness, drowsiness
  • problems with memory or concentration; or
  • ringing in your ears

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Allerphed Interactions

What other drugs affect Allerphed (Pseudoephedrine Triprolidine)?

Tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by pseudoephedrine and triprolidine.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

  • medicines to treat high blood pressure
  • a diuretic (water pill)
  • medication to treat irritable bowel syndrome
  • bladder or urinary medications such as oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol) or tolterodine (Detrol)
  • aspirin or salicylates (such as Disalcid, Doan’s Pills, Dolobid, Salflex, Tricosal, and others)
  • a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin, Tenoretic), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), and others; or
  • antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil), clomipramine (Anafranil), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), and others

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with pseudoephedrine and triprolidine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Allerphed (Pseudoephedrine Triprolidine)?

This medication can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of this medication.

Avoid taking diet pills, caffeine pills, or other stimulants (such as ADHD medications) without your doctor’s advice. Taking a stimulant together with a decongestant can increase your risk of unpleasant side effects.

Do not use any other over-the-counter cold, allergy, or sleep medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much of a certain drug. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains an antihistamine or decongestant.

Allerphed Dosage

How should I take Allerphed (Pseudoephedrine Triprolidine)?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended. Cold medicine is usually taken only for a short time until your symptoms clear up.

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 2 years old. Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow the pill whole. It is specially made to release medicine slowly in the body. Breaking or opening the pill would cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

Measure the liquid form of this medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 7 days of treatment, or if you have a fever with a headache, cough, or skin rash.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time if you have taken a cold medicine within the past few days.

This medication can cause you to have unusual results with allergy skin tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are taking an antihistamine.

Store the medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I overdose on Allerphed (Pseudoephedrine Triprolidine)?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include feeling restless or nervous, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, warmth or tingly feeling, or seizure (convulsions).

What happens if I miss a dose of Allerphed (Pseudoephedrine Triprolidine)?

Since cold or allergy medicine is usually taken only as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are taking the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Allerhist-1 (Clemastine)

What is Allerhist-1 (Clemastine)?

Clemastine is an antihistamine. Clemastine blocks the effects of the naturally occurring chemical histamine in your body.

Clemastine is used to treat sneezing, runny nose, itching watery eyes, hives, rashes, itching, and other symptoms of allergies and the common cold.

Clemastine is may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Allerhist-1 (Clemastine)?

Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Clemastine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities.

Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking clemastine.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Allerhist-1 (Clemastine)?

Do not take clemastine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

  • glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye
  • a stomach ulcer
  • an enlarged prostate, bladder problems, or difficulty urinating
  • an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism)
  • hypertension or any type of heart problems; or
  • asthma

You may not be able to take clemastine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Clemastine is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is unlikely to harm an unborn baby. Do not take clemastine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant.

Clemastine passes into breast milk. Infants are especially sensitive to the effects of antihistamines, and serious side effects could occur in a nursing baby. Clemastine is not recommended if you are breast-feeding a baby. Do not take clemastine without first talking to your doctor if you are nursing a baby.

If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from clemastine. You may require a lower dose of this medication.

Allerhist-1 Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Allerhist-1 (Clemastine)?

Stop taking clemastine and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take clemastine and talk to your doctor if you experience

  • sleepiness, fatigue, or dizziness
  • headache
  • dry mouth; or
  • difficulty urinating or an enlarged prostate

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Allerhist-1 Interactions

What other drugs affect Allerhist-1 (Clemastine)?

Do not take clemastine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Talk to your pharmacist before taking other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or insomnia medications. These may contain medicines similar to clemastine, which could lead to an overdose of antihistamine.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

  • anxiety or sleep medicines such as alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), temazepam (Restoril), or triazolam (Halcion)
  • medications for depression such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), or paroxetine (Paxil); or
  • any other medications that make you feel drowsy, sleepy, or relaxed

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with clemastine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

What should I avoid while taking Allerhist-1 (Clemastine)?

Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Clemastine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities.

Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking clemastine.

Allerhist-1 Dosage

How should I take Allerhist-1 (Clemastine)?

Take clemastine exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water.

Clemastine can be taken with or without food.

To ensure that you get a correct dose, measure the syrup form of clemastine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular tablespoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Never take more of this medication than is prescribed for you. The maximum amount of clemastine that you should take in 1 day is 8.04 mg.

Store clemastine at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I overdose on Allerhist-1 (Clemastine)?

Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a clemastine overdose include extreme sleepiness, confusion, weakness, ringing in the ears, blurred vision, large pupils, dry mouth, flushing, fever, shaking, insomnia, hallucinations, and possibly seizures.

What happens if I miss a dose of Allerhist-1 (Clemastine)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take only your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Allergy Sinus Maximum Strength (Apap/Chlorpheniramine/Pseudoephedrine)

What is Allergy Sinus Maximum Strength (Apap/Chlorpheniramine/Pseudoephedrine)?

Acetaminophen is a pain reliever and fever reducer.

Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine that reduces the natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose.

Pseudoephedrine is a decongestant that shrinks blood vessels in the nasal passages. Dilated blood vessels can cause nasal congestion (stuffy nose).

The combination of acetaminophen, chlorpheniramine, and pseudoephedrine is used to treat runny or stuffy nose, sinus congestion, sneezing, and pain or fever caused by allergies or the common cold.

Acetaminophen, chlorpheniramine, and pseudoephedrine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Allergy Sinus Maximum Strength (Apap/Chlorpheniramine/Pseudoephedrine)?

There are many brands and forms of this medication available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 2 years old. Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

Do not use this medication if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days.

Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of acetaminophen can cause damage to your liver.

Do not use any other cough, cold, allergy, or pain medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much of a certain drug. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains acetaminophen (sometimes abbreviated as “APAP”), chlorpheniramine, or pseudoephedrine.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase the risk of liver damage while you are taking acetaminophen. If you drink more than three alcoholic beverages per day, do not take acetaminophen without your doctor’s advice, and never take more than 2 grams (2000 mg) per day.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Allergy Sinus Maximum Strength (Apap/Chlorpheniramine/Pseudoephedrine)?

Do not use this medication if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take a decongestant before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

Do not take this medication if you are allergic to acetaminophen, chlorpheniramine, or pseudoephedrine, or to other antihistamines or decongestants, diet pills, stimulants, or ADHD medications.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist about using acetaminophen, chlorpheniramine, and pseudoephedrine if you have:

  • heart disease or high blood pressure
  • liver disease, alcoholism, or cirrhosis of the liver
  • glaucoma
  • kidney disease
  • diabetes
  • a thyroid disorder
  • an enlarged prostate; or
  • problems with urination

This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

This medication may pass into breast milk and could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Artificially-sweetened liquid forms of cold medicine may contain phenylalanine. This would be important to know if you have phenylketonuria (PKU). Check the ingredients and warnings on the medication label if you are concerned about phenylalanine.

Allergy Sinus Maximum Strength Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Allergy Sinus Maximum Strength (Apap/Chlorpheniramine/Pseudoephedrine)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • fast, pounding, or uneven heartbeat
  • confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior
  • severe dizziness, anxiety, restless feeling, or nervousness
  • increased blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, trouble concentrating, chest pain, numbness, seizure)
  • urinating less than usual or not at all
  • easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness, fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; or
  • nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes)

Less serious side effects may include:

  • blurred vision
  • dry mouth
  • mild loss of appetite
  • nausea, stomach pain, constipation
  • dizziness, drowsiness
  • problems with memory or concentration
  • ringing in your ears
  • restless or excitability (especially in children)
  • sleep problems (insomnia)
  • skin rash, redness, or itching; or
  • warmth, tingling, or redness under your skin

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Allergy Sinus Maximum Strength Interactions

What other drugs affect Allergy Sinus Maximum Strength (Apap/Chlorpheniramine/Pseudoephedrine)?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by chlorpheniramine.

Also tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

  • an antidepressant
  • a bronchodilator
  • a diuretic (water pill)
  • gout medications
  • blood pressure medication
  • medication to treat irritable bowel syndrome
  • bladder or urinary medications such as oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol) or tolterodine (Detrol)
  • seizure medication
  • isoniazid
  • zidovudine (Retrovir, AZT)
  • aspirin or salicylates (such as Disalcid, Doan’s Pills, Dolobid, Salflex, Tricosal, and others); or
  • a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin, Tenoretic), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), and others

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with acetaminophen, chlorpheniramine, and pseudoephedrine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Allergy Sinus Maximum Strength (Apap/Chlorpheniramine/Pseudoephedrine)?

Avoid taking diet pills, caffeine pills, or other stimulants (such as ADHD medications) without your doctor’s advice. Taking a stimulant together with a decongestant can increase your risk of unpleasant side effects.

Do not use any other cough, cold, allergy, or pain medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. Acetaminophen (sometimes abbreviated as “APAP”), chlorpheniramine, and pseudoephedrine are contained in many cold and pain medicines available over the counter. If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much of a certain drug. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains acetaminophen, APAP, chlorpheniramine, or pseudoephedrine.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase the risk of liver damage while you are taking acetaminophen. If you drink more than three alcoholic beverages per day, do not take acetaminophen without your doctor’s advice, and never take more than 2 grams (2000 mg) per day.

This medication can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather.

Allergy Sinus Maximum Strength Dosage

How should I take Allergy Sinus Maximum Strength (Apap/Chlorpheniramine/Pseudoephedrine)?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended. Cold medicine should be taken only for a short time until your symptoms clear up.

An overdose of acetaminophen can cause serious harm. The maximum amount of acetaminophen for adults is 1 gram (1000 mg) per dose and 4 grams (4000 mg) per day. Taking more acetaminophen could cause damage to your liver. One packet of acetaminophen, chlorpheniramine, and pseudoephedrine powder may contain up to 1000 mg of acetaminophen. Know the amount of acetaminophen in the specific product you are taking.

Take this medication with food or milk if it upsets your stomach.

Drink extra fluids while you are taking acetaminophen, chlorpheniramine, and pseudoephedrine.

Measure the liquid form of this medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 2 years old. Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 7 days of treatment, or if you have a fever with a headache, cough, or skin rash.

This medication can cause you to have unusual results with allergy skin tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are taking an antihistamine.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time if you have taken a cold medicine within the past few days.

Store this medication at room temperature, away from heat, light, and moisture.

What happens if I overdose on Allergy Sinus Maximum Strength (Apap/Chlorpheniramine/Pseudoephedrine)?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

The first signs of an acetaminophen overdose include loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, sweating, and confusion or weakness. Later symptoms may include pain in your upper stomach, dark urine, and yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes.

Overdose symptoms may also include feeling restless or nervous, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, warmth or tingly feeling, or seizure (convulsions).

What happens if I miss a dose of Allergy Sinus Maximum Strength (Apap/Chlorpheniramine/Pseudoephedrine)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com