Congenital afibrinogenemia : Overview, Causes, & Risk Factors

Definition

Congenital afibrinogenemia is a rare, inherited blood disorder in which the blood does not clot normally. It occurs when there is a lack (deficiency) of a protein called fibrinogen, which is needed for the blood to clot.

Overview, Causes, & Risk Factors

This rare disease is caused by an abnormal gene that must be passed down from both parents. It causes a severe lack of fibrinogen. (Dysfibrinogenemia, in which there is a defect in fibrinogen function, is a different condition.)

Congenital afibrinogenemia can occur in males or females. The main risk factor is a family history of bleeding disorders.


Review Date : 3/2/2009
Reviewed By : David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine; and Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

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