Ustekinumab

What is Ustekinumab?

Ustekinumab is an immunosuppressant that reduces the effects of a substance in the body that can cause inflammation.

Ustekinumab is used to treat plaque psoriasis (raised, silvery flaking of the skin) in adults.

Ustekinumab may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Ustekinumab?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to ustekinumab or if you have received a BCG (Bacillus Calmette and Gu

Before using ustekinumab, tell your doctor if you have an active infection, a history of tuberculosis or recurrent infections, high blood pressure, a weak immune system, or if you are receiving phototherapy (light therapy).

Your doctor may perform tests to make sure you do not have tuberculosis or other infections.

Make sure you are current on all vaccines before you start treatment with ustekinumab.

Ustekinumab can make it easier for you to get sick. Avoid being near people who have colds, the flu, or other contagious illnesses.

Contact your doctor right away if you have signs of infection such as fever, chills, sore throat, flu symptoms, swollen glands, unusual weakness, mouth and throat ulcers, rapid heart rate, rapid and shallow breathing, swelling or redness, pain or burning when you urinate, blood in your urine, severe stomach pain, changes in your bowel habits, cough with yellow or green mucus, stabbing chest pain, or severe headache with confusion, vision problems, or seizure.

Treatment with ustekinumab may increase your risk of developing cancer. Talk to your doctor about your individual risk.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Ustekinumab?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to ustekinumab or if you have received a BCG (Bacillus Calmette and Gu

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use this medication:

  • an active infection
  • a history of recurrent infections
  • a history of tuberculosis
  • high blood pressure
  • a weak immune system; or
  • if you are receiving phototherapy (light therapy)

FDA pregnancy category B. Ustekinumab is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

Ustekinumab can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Treatment with ustekinumab may increase your risk of developing cancer. Talk to your doctor about your individual risk.

Ustekinumab Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Ustekinumab?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • signs of infection such as fever, chills, sore throat, flu symptoms, swollen glands, unusual weakness
  • mouth and throat ulcers, rapid heart rate, rapid and shallow breathing, fainting
  • swelling, pain, tenderness, or redness anywhere on your body
  • pain or burning when you urinate, blood in your urine
  • stomach pain that is sudden and severe or comes on slowly, changes in bowel habits (diarrhea or constipation)
  • cough with yellow or green mucus
  • stabbing chest pain, feeling short of breath; or
  • severe headache, confusion, vision problems, and/or seizure (convulsions)

Less serious side effects may include:

  • cold symptoms (runny or stuffy nose, sore throat)
  • headache, tired feeling
  • mild diarrhea; or
  • mild skin rash or itching

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Ustekinumab Interactions

What other drugs affect Ustekinumab?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

  • drugs that weaken your immune system (such as cancer medicine or steroids)
  • a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin)
  • cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune)
  • digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps)
  • sirolimus (Rapamune) or tacrolimus (Prograf)
  • theophylline (Elixophyllin, Theo-24, Uniphyl)
  • seizure medication such as carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol), divalproex (Depakote), phenytoin (Dilantin), or valproic acid (Depakene); or
  • a heart rhythm medication such as disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), or quinidine (Quinidex, Quin-Release Quin-G)

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with ustekinumab. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Ustekinumab?

Avoid injecting this medication into skin that is bruised, red, tender, or hardened.

Avoid being near people who have colds, the flu, or other contagious illnesses. Contact your doctor at once if you develop signs of infection.

Do not receive a “live” vaccine while you are being treated with ustekinumab, and avoid coming into contact with anyone who has recently received a live vaccine. There is a chance that the virus could be passed on to you. Live vaccines include measles, mumps, rubella (MMR), oral polio, chickenpox (varicella), BCG (Bacillus Calmette and Gu

BCG vaccine should not be given for at least 1 year after you receive your last dose of ustekinumab.

Non-live vaccines (including flu shots) may not work as well during your treatment, and may not fully protect you from disease. Make sure you are current on all vaccines before you begin treatment with ustekinumab.

Ustekinumab Dosage

How should I take Ustekinumab?

Before you start treatment with ustekinumab, your doctor may perform tests to make sure you do not have tuberculosis or other infections.

Ustekinumab is given as an injection under the skin. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give you this injection.

Ustekinumab injections are usually given every 12 weeks, but your first two injections will be 4 weeks apart. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

Ustekinumab can lower blood cells that help your body fight infections. This can make it easier for you to bleed from an injury or get sick from being around others who are ill.

Contact your doctor right away if you have signs of infection such as fever, chills, sore throat, flu symptoms, swollen glands, unusual weakness, mouth sores, swelling or redness, severe stomach pain, cough with mucus, or severe headache. These may be early signs of a severe infection.

To be sure ustekinumab is not causing harmful effects, your doctor will need to check your progress on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled appointments. You must remain under the care of a doctor while you are receiving ustekinumab.

What happens if I overdose on Ustekinumab?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have received too much of this medicine.

Symptoms of a ustekinumab overdose are not known.

What happens if I miss a dose of Ustekinumab?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss an appointment for your ustekinumab injection.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Ursodiol

What is Ursodiol?

Ursodiol is a bile acid that decreases the amount of cholesterol produced by the liver and absorbed by the intestines. Ursodiol helps break down cholesterol that has formed into stones in the gallbladder. Ursodiol also increases bile flow in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

Ursodiol is used to treat small gallstones in people who cannot have gallbladder surgery, and to prevent gallstones in overweight patients undergoing rapid weight loss. Ursodiol is also used to treat primary biliary cirrhosis.

Ursodiol is not for treating gallstones that are calcified.

Ursodiol may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Ursodiol?

Before taking ursodiol, tell your doctor if you are also taking cholestyramine (Questran), colestipol (Colestid), or estrogens (birth control pills or hormone replacement).

Avoid using antacids without your doctor’s advice. Use only the specific type of antacid your doctor recommends. Antacids contain different medicines and some types can make it harder for your body to absorb ursodiol.

To treat gallstones, you may have to take ursodiol for several months, and not all gallstones may completely dissolve. Many people who use this medicine will develop gallstones again within 5 years after treatment with ursodiol. Talk to your doctor about your specific risks for repeated gallstones.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your doctor may perform ultrasound examinations of your gallbladder on a regular basis. Your liver function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Ursodiol?

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have liver disease.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether ursodiol passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

To treat gallstones, you may have to take ursodiol for several months, and not all gallstones may completely dissolve. Many people who use this medicine will develop gallstones again within 5 years after treatment with ursodiol. Talk to your doctor about your specific risks for repeated gallstones.

Ursodiol Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Ursodiol?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Other less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

  • fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms
  • stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea, constipation
  • dizziness, tired feeling
  • back pain
  • runny or stuffy nose, cold symptoms; or
  • headache

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Ursodiol Interactions

What other drugs affect Ursodiol?

Before taking ursodiol, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

  • cholestyramine (Questran)
  • colestipol (Colestid)
  • estrogens (birth control pills or hormone replacement); or
  • antacids that contain aluminum, such as Rolaids, Mylanta, or Maalox)

If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use ursodiol or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect ursodiol. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Ursodiol?

Avoid using antacids without your doctor’s advice. Use only the specific type of antacid your doctor recommends. Antacids contain different medicines and some types can make it harder for your body to absorb ursodiol.

Ursodiol Dosage

How should I take Ursodiol?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the instructions on your prescription label.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. The medication can be taken with meals unless your doctor tells you otherwise.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your doctor may perform ultrasound examinations of your gallbladder on a regular basis. Your liver function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

It may take several months of taking ursodiol before your gallstones dissolve. Take this medication for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor.

It is important to take ursodiol regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store ursodiol at room temperature away from heat, moisture, and light.

What happens if I overdose on Ursodiol?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of ursodiol is likely to cause diarrhea.

What happens if I miss a dose of Ursodiol?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Urso Forte (Ursodiol)

What is Urso Forte (Ursodiol)?

Ursodiol is a bile acid that decreases the amount of cholesterol produced by the liver and absorbed by the intestines. Ursodiol helps break down cholesterol that has formed into stones in the gallbladder. Ursodiol also increases bile flow in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

Ursodiol is used to treat small gallstones in people who cannot have gallbladder surgery, and to prevent gallstones in overweight patients undergoing rapid weight loss. Ursodiol is also used to treat primary biliary cirrhosis.

Ursodiol is not for treating gallstones that are calcified.

Ursodiol may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Urso Forte (Ursodiol)?

Before taking ursodiol, tell your doctor if you are also taking cholestyramine (Questran), colestipol (Colestid), or estrogens (birth control pills or hormone replacement).

Avoid using antacids without your doctor’s advice. Use only the specific type of antacid your doctor recommends. Antacids contain different medicines and some types can make it harder for your body to absorb ursodiol.

To treat gallstones, you may have to take ursodiol for several months, and not all gallstones may completely dissolve. Many people who use this medicine will develop gallstones again within 5 years after treatment with ursodiol. Talk to your doctor about your specific risks for repeated gallstones.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your doctor may perform ultrasound examinations of your gallbladder on a regular basis. Your liver function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Urso Forte (Ursodiol)?

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have liver disease.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether ursodiol passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

To treat gallstones, you may have to take ursodiol for several months, and not all gallstones may completely dissolve. Many people who use this medicine will develop gallstones again within 5 years after treatment with ursodiol. Talk to your doctor about your specific risks for repeated gallstones.

Urso Forte Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Urso Forte (Ursodiol)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Other less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

  • fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms
  • stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea, constipation
  • dizziness, tired feeling
  • back pain
  • runny or stuffy nose, cold symptoms; or
  • headache

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Urso Forte Interactions

What other drugs affect Urso Forte (Ursodiol)?

Before taking ursodiol, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

  • cholestyramine (Questran)
  • colestipol (Colestid)
  • estrogens (birth control pills or hormone replacement); or
  • antacids that contain aluminum, such as Rolaids, Mylanta, or Maalox)

If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use ursodiol or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect ursodiol. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Urso Forte (Ursodiol)?

Avoid using antacids without your doctor’s advice. Use only the specific type of antacid your doctor recommends. Antacids contain different medicines and some types can make it harder for your body to absorb ursodiol.

Urso Forte Dosage

How should I take Urso Forte (Ursodiol)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the instructions on your prescription label.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. The medication can be taken with meals unless your doctor tells you otherwise.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your doctor may perform ultrasound examinations of your gallbladder on a regular basis. Your liver function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

It may take several months of taking ursodiol before your gallstones dissolve. Take this medication for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor.

It is important to take ursodiol regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store ursodiol at room temperature away from heat, moisture, and light.

What happens if I overdose on Urso Forte (Ursodiol)?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of ursodiol is likely to cause diarrhea.

What happens if I miss a dose of Urso Forte (Ursodiol)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Urso (Ursodiol)

What is Urso (Ursodiol)?

Ursodiol is a bile acid that decreases the amount of cholesterol produced by the liver and absorbed by the intestines. Ursodiol helps break down cholesterol that has formed into stones in the gallbladder. Ursodiol also increases bile flow in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

Ursodiol is used to treat small gallstones in people who cannot have gallbladder surgery, and to prevent gallstones in overweight patients undergoing rapid weight loss. Ursodiol is also used to treat primary biliary cirrhosis.

Ursodiol is not for treating gallstones that are calcified.

Ursodiol may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Urso (Ursodiol)?

Before taking ursodiol, tell your doctor if you are also taking cholestyramine (Questran), colestipol (Colestid), or estrogens (birth control pills or hormone replacement).

Avoid using antacids without your doctor’s advice. Use only the specific type of antacid your doctor recommends. Antacids contain different medicines and some types can make it harder for your body to absorb ursodiol.

To treat gallstones, you may have to take ursodiol for several months, and not all gallstones may completely dissolve. Many people who use this medicine will develop gallstones again within 5 years after treatment with ursodiol. Talk to your doctor about your specific risks for repeated gallstones.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your doctor may perform ultrasound examinations of your gallbladder on a regular basis. Your liver function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Urso (Ursodiol)?

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have liver disease.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether ursodiol passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

To treat gallstones, you may have to take ursodiol for several months, and not all gallstones may completely dissolve. Many people who use this medicine will develop gallstones again within 5 years after treatment with ursodiol. Talk to your doctor about your specific risks for repeated gallstones.

Urso Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Urso (Ursodiol)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Other less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

  • fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms
  • stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea, constipation
  • dizziness, tired feeling
  • back pain
  • runny or stuffy nose, cold symptoms; or
  • headache

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Urso Interactions

What other drugs affect Urso (Ursodiol)?

Before taking ursodiol, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

  • cholestyramine (Questran)
  • colestipol (Colestid)
  • estrogens (birth control pills or hormone replacement); or
  • antacids that contain aluminum, such as Rolaids, Mylanta, or Maalox)

If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use ursodiol or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect ursodiol. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Urso (Ursodiol)?

Avoid using antacids without your doctor’s advice. Use only the specific type of antacid your doctor recommends. Antacids contain different medicines and some types can make it harder for your body to absorb ursodiol.

Urso Dosage

How should I take Urso (Ursodiol)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the instructions on your prescription label.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. The medication can be taken with meals unless your doctor tells you otherwise.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your doctor may perform ultrasound examinations of your gallbladder on a regular basis. Your liver function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

It may take several months of taking ursodiol before your gallstones dissolve. Take this medication for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor.

It is important to take ursodiol regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store ursodiol at room temperature away from heat, moisture, and light.

What happens if I overdose on Urso (Ursodiol)?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of ursodiol is likely to cause diarrhea.

What happens if I miss a dose of Urso (Ursodiol)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Uroxatral (Alfuzosin)

What is Uroxatral (Alfuzosin)?

Alfuzosin is in a group of drugs called alpha-adrenergic blockers. Alfuzosin helps relax the muscles in the prostate and bladder neck, making it easier to urinate.

Alfuzosin is used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate).

Alfuzosin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Uroxatral (Alfuzosin)?

Do not use alfuzosin if you have severe liver disease, or if you are also using ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), or ritonavir (Norvir).

Alfuzosin can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Stop using alfuzosin and call your doctor at once if you have new or worsening chest pain, or if you feel light-headed.

Alfuzosin can affect the pupils of your eyes during cataract surgery. If you have cataract surgery during your treatment with alfuzosin, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking this medication. Do not stop using alfuzosin before surgery unless your surgeon tells you to.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Uroxatral (Alfuzosin)?

You should not use alfuzosin if you have:

  • severe liver disease; or
  • if you are also using an antifungal medication such as ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), or ritonavir (Norvir)

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take alfuzosin:

  • prostate cancer
  • liver disease
  • kidney disease
  • a personal or family history of Long QT syndrome
  • angina (chest pain)
  • coronary artery disease (such as arteriosclerosis)
  • low blood pressure
  • a history of an allergic reaction to alfuzosin
  • if you are taking another alpha-blocker such as terazosin (Hytrin), prazosin (Minipress), doxazosin (Cardura), or guanadrel (Hylorel) for high blood pressure or prostate problems
  • if you are taking certain medicines to treat HIV or AIDS

FDA pregnancy category B. Although alfuzosin is not for use in women, this medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. If you are a woman using this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether alfuzosin passes into breast milk, or if it could harm a nursing baby. If you are a woman using this medication, do not take alfuzosin without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Uroxatral Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Uroxatral (Alfuzosin)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using alfuzosin and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • new or worsening chest pain
  • nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes)
  • feeling like you might pass out; or
  • penis erection that is painful or lasts 4 hours or longer

Less serious side effects may include:

  • dizziness or drowsiness
  • headache, tired feeling
  • warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin
  • mild stomach pain, diarrhea, constipation; or
  • sore throat, cough, runny or stuffy nose

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Uroxatral Interactions

What other drugs affect Uroxatral (Alfuzosin)?

Before taking alfuzosin, tell your doctor if you are taking any other medications to treat high blood pressure or prostate problems.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

  • atenolol (Tenormin)
  • cimetidine (Tagamet)
  • conivaptan (Vaprisol)
  • diclofenac (Arthrotec, Cataflam, Voltaren, Flector Patch, Solareze)
  • diltiazem (Cardizem CD, Cartia XT, Tiazac)
  • enoxacin (Penetrex)
  • imatinib (Gleevec)
  • isoniazid (for treating tuberculosis)
  • an antidepressant such as nefazodone
  • an antibiotic such as clarithromycin (Biaxin), dalfopristin/quinupristin (Synercid), erythromycin (E.E.S., EryPed, Ery-Tab, Erythrocin), or telithromycin (Ketek)
  • an antifungal medication such as clotrimazole (Mycelex Troche) voriconazole (Vfend)
  • a nitrate heart medication, such as nitroglycerin (Nitrostat, Nitrolingual, Nitro-Dur, Nitro-Bid, and others), isosorbide dinitrate (Dilatrate-SR, Isordil, Sorbitrate), or isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur, ISMO, Monoket)
  • heart or blood pressure medication such as diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac), nicardipine (Cardene), quinidine (Quinaglute, Quinidex, Quin-Release), or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); or
  • HIV/AIDS medicine such as amprenavir (Agenerase), atazanavir (Reyataz), delavirdine (Rescriptor), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), or saquinavir (Invirase)

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with alfuzosin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Uroxatral (Alfuzosin)?

Alfuzosin can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Uroxatral Dosage

How should I take Uroxatral (Alfuzosin)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take each dose with a full glass of water.

Alfuzosin should be taken just after eating food. Take alfuzosin after the same meal each day. Do not take it on an empty stomach.

Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow the pill whole. It is specially made to release medicine slowly in the body. Breaking or crushing the pill would cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

It is important to use alfuzosin regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Alfuzosin can affect the pupils of your eyes during cataract surgery. If you have cataract surgery during your treatment with alfuzosin, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking this medication. Do not stop using alfuzosin before surgery unless your surgeon tells you to.

Store alfuzosin at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I overdose on Uroxatral (Alfuzosin)?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include weakness, dizziness, a fast but weak pulse, cold or clammy skin, and feeling light-headed or fainting.

What happens if I miss a dose of Uroxatral (Alfuzosin)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Urofollitropin

What is Urofollitropin?

Urofollitropin is a purified form of a hormone called follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). FSH is important in the development of follicles (eggs) that are produced by the ovaries in women.

Urofollitropin is used to treat infertility in women whose own natural FSH is not sufficient in stimulating follicles to mature. Urofollitropin also is used to help the ovaries produce multiple eggs for use in “in vitro” fertilization.

Urofollitropin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Urofollitropin?

Some women using this medicine have developed a condition called ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). This syndrome may be more likely to occur within the first 10 days after receiving the last dose in a treatment cycle. OHSS can be a life-threatening condition. Call your doctor right away if you have any symptoms of OHSS: severe pelvic pain, swelling of the hands or legs, stomach pain and swelling, shortness of breath, weight gain, diarrhea, nausea or vomiting, and urinating less than usual.

Using this medicine can increase your chances of having a multiple pregnancy (twins, triplets, quadruplets, etc). A multiple pregnancy is a high-risk pregnancy for the mother and for the babies. Follow your doctor’s instructions about any special care you may need during your pregnancy.

Although urofollitropin can help you become pregnant, this medication is in the FDA pregnancy category X. This means that using the medication once you are pregnant can cause birth defects in the baby. Do not use this medication if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Urofollitropin?

Urofollitropin will not cause ovulation (production of an egg by the ovaries). You may need to receive other medications to stimulate ovulation.

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to urofollitropin medications, or if you have:

  • infertility that is not caused by lack of ovulation
  • a condition called primary ovarian failure
  • unusual vaginal bleeding
  • an ovarian cyst
  • a tumor of your pituitary gland
  • an untreated or uncontrolled disorder of your thyroid or adrenal gland; or
  • if you are pregnant

Using this medicine can increase your chances of having a multiple pregnancy (twins, triplets, quadruplets, etc). A multiple pregnancy is a high-risk pregnancy for the mother and for the babies. Follow your doctor’s instructions about any special care you may need during your pregnancy.

Although urofollitropin can help you become pregnant, this medication is in the FDA pregnancy category X. This means that using the medication once you are pregnant can cause birth defects in the baby. Do not use this medication if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether urofollitropin passes into breast milk. Do not use urofollitropin without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Urofollitropin Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Urofollitropin?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Some women using this medicine have developed a condition called ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). This syndrome may be more likely to occur within the first 10 days after receiving the last dose in a treatment cycle. OHSS can be a life-threatening condition.

Stop using urofollitropin and call your doctor at once if you have any symptoms of OHSS:

  • severe pelvic pain
  • swelling of your hands or legs
  • stomach pain and swelling
  • shortness of breath
  • weight gain
  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea; or
  • urinating less than usual

Less serious side effects may include:

  • mild stomach upset, constipation
  • mild pelvic pain, cramps
  • breast tenderness
  • skin rash
  • hot flashes
  • acne; or
  • pain, swelling, redness, itching, or irritation where the medicine was injected

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088

Urofollitropin Interactions

What other drugs affect Urofollitropin?

There may be other drugs that can interact with urofollitropin. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Urofollitropin?

Follow your doctor’s instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while you are using urofollitropin.

Urofollitropin Dosage

How should I take Urofollitropin?

Use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Urofollitropin is given as an injection under the skin or into a muscle. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give you this injection. You may be shown how to inject your medicine at home. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles and syringes.

Urofollitropin comes as a powder and liquid (diluent) that must be mixed together before you draw your dose into a syringe.

Do not shake the mixture. Vigorous shaking can ruin the medicine. Do not draw your urofollitropin dose into a syringe until you are ready to give yourself an injection. Do not use the medication if it does not clear after mixing, or if it has any particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

After giving the injection, throw away any portion of the mixed medicine that is not used right away. Do not save it for later use.

Use each disposable needle only one time. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your doctor will need to check you on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Infertility is often treated with a combination of different drugs. For best results, use all of your medications as directed by your doctor. Be sure to read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each of your medications. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without advice from your doctor.

If you store urofollitropin at home, keep it at room temperature away from light, moisture, and heat.

What happens if I overdose on Urofollitropin?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Symptoms of a urofollitropin overdose are not known.

What happens if I miss a dose of Urofollitropin?

Call your doctor if you miss a dose of urofollitropin.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Urocit-K (Potassium Citrate)

What is Urocit-K (Potassium Citrate)?

Potassium is a mineral that is found in many foods and is needed for several functions of your body, especially the beating of your heart.

Potassium citrate is used to treat a kidney stone condition called renal tubular acidosis.

Potassium citrate may also be used for other purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Urocit-K (Potassium Citrate)?

You should not use this medication if you have kidney failure, a urinary tract infection, uncontrolled diabetes, a peptic ulcer in your stomach, Addison’s disease, severe burns or other tissue injury, if you are dehydrated, if you take certain diuretics (water pills), or if you have high levels of potassium in your blood (hyperkalemia).

You should not take potassium citrate tablets if you have problems with your esophagus, stomach, or intestines that make it difficult for you to swallow or digest pills.

Do not crush, chew, break, or suck on an extended-release tablet. Swallow the pill whole. Breaking or crushing the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. Sucking on a potassium tablet can irritate your mouth or throat.

Avoid lying down for at least 30 minutes after you take this medication.

Take this medication with a meal or bedtime snack, or within 30 minutes after a meal.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood may need to be tested often. Your heart rate may also be checked using an electrocardiograph or ECG (sometimes called an EKG) to measure electrical activity of the heart. This test will help your doctor determine how long to treat you with potassium. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Serious side effects of potassium citrate include uneven heartbeat, muscle weakness or limp feeling, severe stomach pain, and numbness or tingling in your hands, feet, or mouth.

Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking potassium suddenly, your condition may become worse.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Urocit-K (Potassium Citrate)?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to it, or if you have certain conditions. Be sure your doctor knows if you have:

  • high levels of potassium in your blood (hyperkalemia)
  • kidney failure
  • a urinary tract infection
  • untreated or uncontrolled diabetes
  • Addison’s disease (an adrenal gland disorder)
  • a large tissue injury such as a severe burn
  • a peptic ulcer in your stomach
  • if you are severely dehydrated; or
  • if you are taking a “potassium-sparing” diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), spironolactone (Aldactone, Aldactazide), triamterene (Dyrenium, Dyazide, Maxzide)

You should not take potassium citrate tablets if you have problems with your esophagus, stomach, or intestines that make it difficult for you to swallow or digest pills.

Before using potassium citrate, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • kidney disease
  • congestive heart failure, enlarged heart, or history of heart attack
  • other heart disease or high blood pressure
  • diabetes
  • a blockage in your stomach or intestines; or
  • chronic diarrhea (such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease)

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take potassium citrate.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether potassium passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Urocit-K Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Urocit-K (Potassium Citrate)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • confusion, anxiety, feeling like you might pass out
  • uneven heartbeat
  • extreme thirst, increased urination
  • leg discomfort
  • muscle weakness or limp feeling
  • numbness or tingly feeling in your hands or feet, or around your mouth
  • severe stomach pain, ongoing diarrhea or vomiting
  • black, bloody, or tarry stools; or
  • coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds

Less serious side effects may include:

  • mild nausea or upset stomach
  • mild or occasional diarrhea; or
  • appearance of a potassium citrate tablet in your stool

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Urocit-K Interactions

What other drugs affect Urocit-K (Potassium Citrate)?

The following drugs can interact with potassium citrate. Tell your doctor if you are using any of these:

  • eplerenone (Inspra)
  • digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin)
  • candesartan (Atacand), losartan (Cozaar, Hyzaar), valsartan (Diovan), or telmisartan (Micardis)
  • glycopyrrolate (Robinul)
  • mepenzolate (Cantil)
  • quinidine (Quinaglute, Quinidex, Quin-Release)
  • atropine (Donnatal, and others), benztropine (Cogentin), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm-Scop)
  • a bronchodilator such as ipratroprium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva)
  • bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare)
  • irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others), or propantheline (Pro-Banthine)
  • an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); or
  • any type of diuretic (water pill) such as bumetanide (Bumex), chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Lopressor, Vasoretic, Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zarxolyn), or torsemide (Demadex)

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with potassium citrate. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Urocit-K (Potassium Citrate)?

Avoid lying down for at least 30 minutes after you take this medication.

Avoid taking potassium supplements or using other products that contain potassium without first asking your doctor. Salt substitutes or low-salt dietary products often contain potassium. If you take certain products together you may accidentally get too much potassium. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains potassium.

While taking this medication, avoid strenuous exercise if you are not in proper condition for it.

Urocit-K Dosage

How should I take Urocit-K (Potassium Citrate)?

Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Do not crush, chew, break, or suck on an extended-release tablet. Swallow the pill whole. Breaking or crushing the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. Sucking on a potassium tablet can irritate your mouth or throat. Call your doctor if it feels like the tablet is getting stuck in your throat when you swallow it.

Measure the liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Liquid potassium should be mixed with at least 4 ounces (one-half cup) of cold water or fruit juice. Drink the mixture slowly, over 5 to 10 minutes in all. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

Take this medication with a meal or bedtime snack, or within 30 minutes after a meal.

Your treatment may include a special diet. It is very important to follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor. You should become very familiar with the list of foods you should eat or avoid to help control your condition.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood may need to be tested often. Your heart rate may also be checked using an electrocardiograph or ECG (sometimes called an EKG) to measure electrical activity of the heart. This test will help your doctor determine how long to treat you with potassium. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking potassium suddenly, your condition may become worse.

Store potassium citrate at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep the medication in a closed container.

What happens if I overdose on Urocit-K (Potassium Citrate)?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include heavy feeling in your arms or legs, muscle weakness, limp feeling, slow or uneven heartbeat, chest pain, or feeling like you might pass out.

What happens if I miss a dose of Urocit-K (Potassium Citrate)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Uro-Mag (Magnesium Oxide)

What is Uro-Mag (Magnesium Oxide)?

Magnesium is a naturally occurring mineral. Magnesium is important for many systems in the body especially the muscles and nerves.

Magnesium oxide is used as a supplement to maintain adequate magnesium in the body.

Magnesium oxide may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Uro-Mag (Magnesium Oxide)?

Before taking magnesium oxide, tell your doctor if you have any other medical conditions, allergies, or if you take other medicines or other herbal/health supplements. Magnesium oxide may not be recommended in some situations.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Uro-Mag (Magnesium Oxide)?

Do not take magnesium oxide without first talking to your doctor if you have kidney disease.

Before taking magnesium oxide, tell your doctor if you have any other medical conditions, allergies, or if you take other medicines or other herbal/health supplements. Magnesium oxide may not be recommended in some situations.

It is not known whether magnesium oxide will harm an unborn baby. Do not take magnesium oxide without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy.

It is not known whether magnesium oxide will harm an nursing baby. Do not take magnesium oxide without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Uro-Mag Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Uro-Mag (Magnesium Oxide)?

Stop taking magnesium oxide and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take magnesium oxide and talk to your doctor if you experience diarrhea or an upset stomach.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Uro-Mag Interactions

What other drugs affect Uro-Mag (Magnesium Oxide)?

Before taking magnesium oxide, talk to your doctor if you are taking

  • a tetracycline antibiotic such as tetracycline (Sumycin, Achromycin V, and others), demeclocycline (Declomycin), doxycycline (Vibramycin, Monodox, Doxy, and others), minocycline (Minocin, Dynacin, and others), or oxytetracycline (Terramycin, and others)
  • a fluoroquinolone antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), ofloxacin (Floxin), enoxacin (Penetrex), norfloxacin (Noroxin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), levofloxacin (Levaquin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), grepafloxacin (Raxar), and others
  • penicillamine (Cuprimine)
  • digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); or
  • nitrofurantoin (Macrodantin, Furadantin, others)

You not be able to take magnesium oxide, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during your treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above.

Drugs other than those listed here can also interact with magnesium oxide. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any over-the-counter or prescription medicines.

What should I avoid while taking Uro-Mag (Magnesium Oxide)?

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while taking magnesium oxide unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

Uro-Mag Dosage

How should I take Uro-Mag (Magnesium Oxide)?

Take magnesium oxide exactly as directed by your doctor or as directed on the package. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take the tablets and capsules with a full glass of water.

To ensure that you get the correct dose, measure the liquid form of magnesium with a dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Do not take more magnesium oxide than is directed.

Store magnesium oxide at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I overdose on Uro-Mag (Magnesium Oxide)?

Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of an magnesium oxide overdose include nausea, vomiting, flushing, low blood pressure, a slow heartbeat, drowsiness, coma, and death.

What happens if I miss a dose of Uro-Mag (Magnesium Oxide)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the dose you missed and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Uro-Jet AC

What is Uro-Jet AC?

Lidocaine is a local anesthetic (numbing medication). It works by blocking nerve signals in your body.

Lidocaine topical (for use on the skin) is used to reduce pain or discomfort caused by skin irritations such as sunburn, insect bites, poison ivy, poison oak, poison sumac, and minor cuts, scratches, hemorrhoids, and burns.

Lidocaine topical may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Uro-Jet AC?

An overdose of numbing medications can cause fatal side effects if too much of the medicine is absorbed through your skin and into your blood. This is more likely to occur when using a numbing medicine without the advice of a medical doctor (such as during a cosmetic procedure like laser hair removal). However, overdose has also occurred in women treated with a numbing medicine before having a mammography. Overdose symptoms may include uneven heartbeats, seizure (convulsions), coma, slowed breathing, or respiratory failure (breathing stops).

Your body may absorb more of this medication if you use too much, if you apply it over large skin areas, or if you apply heat, bandages, or plastic wrap to treated skin areas. Skin that is cut or irritated may also absorb more topical medication than healthy skin.

Use the smallest amount of this medication needed to numb the skin or relieve pain. Do not use large amounts of lidocaine topical, or cover treated skin areas with a bandage or plastic wrap without medical advice. Be aware that many cosmetic procedures are performed without a medical doctor present.

Keep both used and unused lidocaine topical patches out of the reach of children or pets. The amount of lidocaine in the skin patches could be harmful to a child or pet who accidentally sucks on or swallows the patch. Seek emergency medical attention if this happens.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Uro-Jet AC?

An overdose of numbing medications can cause fatal side effects if too much of the medicine is absorbed through your skin and into your blood.

Overdose is more likely to occur when using a numbing medicine without the advice of a medical doctor (such as during a cosmetic procedure like laser hair removal). However, overdose has also occurred in women treated with a numbing medicine before having a mammography. Symptoms may include uneven heartbeats, seizure (convulsions), coma, slowed breathing, or respiratory failure (breathing stops).

Do not use lidocaine topical if you are allergic to any other type of numbing medicine.

Before using lidocaine topical, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have liver disease, or broken, swollen, or damaged skin. You may not be able to use lidocaine topical, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

Lidocaine topical can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Uro-Jet AC Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Uro-Jet AC?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using lidocaine topical and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • uneven heartbeats
  • drowsiness, confusion
  • tremors, seizure (convulsions); or
  • blurred vision

Less serious side effects include:

  • mild irritation, redness, or swelling where the medication is applied
  • numbness in places where the medicine is accidentally applied

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Uro-Jet AC Interactions

What other drugs affect Uro-Jet AC?

Before using lidocaine topical, tell your doctor if you are taking medication to treat a heart rhythm disorder, such as:

  • quinidine (Quinidex, Quinaglute)
  • disopyramide (Norpace)
  • flecainide (Tambocor)
  • mexiletine (Mexitil)
  • procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl)
  • tocainide (Tonocard); or
  • propafenone (Rythmol)

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with lidocaine topical. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Uro-Jet AC?

Do not allow this medication to come into contact with your eyes. If it does, rinse with water. Avoid touching the sticky side of a lidocaine skin patch while applying it.

Avoid using other topical medications on the affected area unless your doctor has told you to.

Uro-Jet AC Dosage

How should I take Uro-Jet AC?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended.

Lidocaine topical comes in many different forms for different uses. Lidocaine topical cream, lotion, spray, solution, film, and transdermal patch are generally for use on the skin only.

If your medication comes with patient instructions for safe and effective use, follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Your body may absorb more of this medication if you use too much, if you apply it over large skin areas, or if you apply heat, bandages, or plastic wrap to treated skin areas. Skin that is cut or irritated may also absorb more topical medication than healthy skin.

Use the smallest amount of this medication needed to numb the skin or relieve pain. Do not use large amounts of lidocaine topical, or cover treated skin areas with a bandage or plastic wrap without medical advice. Be aware that many cosmetic procedures are performed without a medical doctor present.

Do not apply this medication to swollen skin areas or deep puncture wounds. Avoid using the medicine on skin that is raw or blistered, such as a severe burn or abrasion.

Lidocaine topical may be applied with your finger tips or a cotton swab. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

Store lidocaine topical at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Keep both used and unused lidocaine topical patches out of the reach of children or pets. The amount of lidocaine in the skin patches could be harmful to a child or pet who accidentally sucks on or swallows the patch. Seek emergency medical attention if this happens.

What happens if I overdose on Uro-Jet AC?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Lidocaine topical applied to the skin is not likely to cause an overdose unless you apply more than the recommended dose. Overdose may also occur if you apply heat, bandages, or plastic wrap to treated skin areas.

Improper use of lidocaine topical may result in death.

Overdose symptoms may include drowsiness, confusion, nervousness, ringing in your ears, blurred vision, feeling hot or cold, numbness, muscle twitches, uneven heartbeats, seizure (convulsions), slowed breathing, or respiratory failure (breathing stops).

What happens if I miss a dose of Uro-Jet AC?

Since lidocaine topical is used as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are using the medication regularly, use the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and use the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com

Uro-Jet

What is Uro-Jet?

Lidocaine is a local anesthetic (numbing medication). It works by blocking nerve signals in your body.

Lidocaine topical (for use on the skin) is used to reduce pain or discomfort caused by skin irritations such as sunburn, insect bites, poison ivy, poison oak, poison sumac, and minor cuts, scratches, hemorrhoids, and burns.

Lidocaine topical may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Uro-Jet?

An overdose of numbing medications can cause fatal side effects if too much of the medicine is absorbed through your skin and into your blood. This is more likely to occur when using a numbing medicine without the advice of a medical doctor (such as during a cosmetic procedure like laser hair removal). However, overdose has also occurred in women treated with a numbing medicine before having a mammography. Overdose symptoms may include uneven heartbeats, seizure (convulsions), coma, slowed breathing, or respiratory failure (breathing stops).

Your body may absorb more of this medication if you use too much, if you apply it over large skin areas, or if you apply heat, bandages, or plastic wrap to treated skin areas. Skin that is cut or irritated may also absorb more topical medication than healthy skin.

Use the smallest amount of this medication needed to numb the skin or relieve pain. Do not use large amounts of lidocaine topical, or cover treated skin areas with a bandage or plastic wrap without medical advice. Be aware that many cosmetic procedures are performed without a medical doctor present.

Keep both used and unused lidocaine topical patches out of the reach of children or pets. The amount of lidocaine in the skin patches could be harmful to a child or pet who accidentally sucks on or swallows the patch. Seek emergency medical attention if this happens.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Uro-Jet?

An overdose of numbing medications can cause fatal side effects if too much of the medicine is absorbed through your skin and into your blood.

Overdose is more likely to occur when using a numbing medicine without the advice of a medical doctor (such as during a cosmetic procedure like laser hair removal). However, overdose has also occurred in women treated with a numbing medicine before having a mammography. Symptoms may include uneven heartbeats, seizure (convulsions), coma, slowed breathing, or respiratory failure (breathing stops).

Do not use lidocaine topical if you are allergic to any other type of numbing medicine.

Before using lidocaine topical, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have liver disease, or broken, swollen, or damaged skin. You may not be able to use lidocaine topical, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

Lidocaine topical can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Uro-Jet Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of Uro-Jet?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using lidocaine topical and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • uneven heartbeats
  • drowsiness, confusion
  • tremors, seizure (convulsions); or
  • blurred vision

Less serious side effects include:

  • mild irritation, redness, or swelling where the medication is applied
  • numbness in places where the medicine is accidentally applied

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Uro-Jet Interactions

What other drugs affect Uro-Jet?

Before using lidocaine topical, tell your doctor if you are taking medication to treat a heart rhythm disorder, such as:

  • quinidine (Quinidex, Quinaglute)
  • disopyramide (Norpace)
  • flecainide (Tambocor)
  • mexiletine (Mexitil)
  • procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl)
  • tocainide (Tonocard); or
  • propafenone (Rythmol)

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with lidocaine topical. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I avoid while taking Uro-Jet?

Do not allow this medication to come into contact with your eyes. If it does, rinse with water. Avoid touching the sticky side of a lidocaine skin patch while applying it.

Avoid using other topical medications on the affected area unless your doctor has told you to.

Uro-Jet Dosage

How should I take Uro-Jet?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended.

Lidocaine topical comes in many different forms for different uses. Lidocaine topical cream, lotion, spray, solution, film, and transdermal patch are generally for use on the skin only.

If your medication comes with patient instructions for safe and effective use, follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Your body may absorb more of this medication if you use too much, if you apply it over large skin areas, or if you apply heat, bandages, or plastic wrap to treated skin areas. Skin that is cut or irritated may also absorb more topical medication than healthy skin.

Use the smallest amount of this medication needed to numb the skin or relieve pain. Do not use large amounts of lidocaine topical, or cover treated skin areas with a bandage or plastic wrap without medical advice. Be aware that many cosmetic procedures are performed without a medical doctor present.

Do not apply this medication to swollen skin areas or deep puncture wounds. Avoid using the medicine on skin that is raw or blistered, such as a severe burn or abrasion.

Lidocaine topical may be applied with your finger tips or a cotton swab. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

Store lidocaine topical at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Keep both used and unused lidocaine topical patches out of the reach of children or pets. The amount of lidocaine in the skin patches could be harmful to a child or pet who accidentally sucks on or swallows the patch. Seek emergency medical attention if this happens.

What happens if I overdose on Uro-Jet?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Lidocaine topical applied to the skin is not likely to cause an overdose unless you apply more than the recommended dose. Overdose may also occur if you apply heat, bandages, or plastic wrap to treated skin areas.

Improper use of lidocaine topical may result in death.

Overdose symptoms may include drowsiness, confusion, nervousness, ringing in your ears, blurred vision, feeling hot or cold, numbness, muscle twitches, uneven heartbeats, seizure (convulsions), slowed breathing, or respiratory failure (breathing stops).

What happens if I miss a dose of Uro-Jet?

Since lidocaine topical is used as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are using the medication regularly, use the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and use the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Edited from everydayhealth.com