Bladder outlet obstruction : Overview, Causes, & Risk Factors

Alternate Names : BOO, Lower urinary tract obstruction, Prostatism

Definition

Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) is a blockage at the base of the bladder that reduces or prevents the flow of urine into the urethra, the tube that carries urine out of the body.

Overview, Causes, & Risk Factors

Bladder outlet obstruction can have many different causes, including:

  • Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)
  • Bladder stones
  • Bladder tumors (cancer)
  • Pelvic tumors (cervix, prostate, uterus, rectum)
  • Urethral stricture (scar tissue)

Less common causes of bladder outlet obstruction include:

  • Cystocele
  • Foreign objects
  • Posterior urethral valves (congenital birth defect)
  • Urethral spasms
  • Urethral diverticula

Bladder outlet obstruction is most common in aging men. It is often caused by BPH. Bladder stones and bladder cancer are also more commonly seen in men than women. As a man ages, the chance of developing these diseases increases dramatically.

See also:

  • Benign prostatic hypertrophy
  • Bladder stones
  • Obstructive nephropathy
  • Reflux nephropathy

Pictures & Images

Kidney anatomy

The kidneys are responsible for removing wastes from the body, regulating electrolyte balance and blood pressure, and stimulating red blood cell production.

Female urinary tract

Female urinary tract

The female and male urinary tracts are relatively the same except for the length of the urethra.

Male urinary tract

Male urinary tract

The male and female urinary tracts are relatively the same except for the length of the urethra.

Kidney – blood and urine flow

Kidney - blood and urine flow

This is the typical appearance of the blood vessels (vasculature) and urine flow pattern in the kidney. The blood vessels are shown in red and the urine flow pattern in yellow.

Bladder outlet obstruction : Overview, Causes, & Risk

Bladder outlet obstruction : Symptoms & Signs, Diagnosis & Tests

Bladder outlet obstruction : Treatment


Review Date : 11/30/2009
Reviewed By : David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine; Herbert Y. Lin, MD, PHD, Nephrologist, Massachusetts General Hospital; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only — they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2010 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com

Disclaimer: This content including advice provides generic information only. It is in no way a substitute for qualified medical opinion. Always consult a specialist or your own doctor for more information. NDTV does not claim responsibility for this information.

Tags: , , .

Leave a comment