Infertility: Treatment

Treatment

Increase your chance of becoming pregnant each month by having sexual intercourse at least every 3 days in the weeks leading up to and through the expected time of ovulation. Ovulation occurs about 2 weeks before the next period starts. So, if you get your period every 28 days, you should have sexual intercourse at least every 3 days between the 7th and 18th day after you get your period.

Treatment depends on the cause of infertility. It may involve:

  • Education and counseling
  • Medical procedures such as intrauterine insemination (IUI) and in vitro fertilization (IVF)
  • Medicines to treat infections and clotting disorders, or promote ovulation

It is important to recognize and discuss the emotional impact that infertility has on you and your partner, and to seek medical advice from your health care provider.

Support Groups

Many organizations provide informal support and referrals for professional counseling. See infertility – support group.

Prognosis (Expectations)

A cause can be determined for about 80 – 85% of infertile couples.

Getting the right therapy (not including advanced techniques such as in vitro fertilization) allows pregnancy to occur in 50 – 60% of couples who were infertile.

Without any treatment, 15 – 20% of couples diagnosed as infertile will eventually become pregnant.

Complications

Although infertility itself does not cause physical illness, it can have a major emotional impact on the couples and individuals it affects.

Couples may have problems with their marriage. Individuals may experience depression and anxiety.

Calling Your Health Care Provider

Call for an appointment with your health care provider if you are unable to get pregnant.

Pictures & Images

Pelvic laparoscopy


Review Date : 3/17/2009
Reviewed By : Linda Vorvick, MD, Family Physician, Seattle Site Coordinator, Lecturer, Pathophysiology, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine; Susan Storck, MD, FACOG, Chief, Eastside Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, Redmond, WA; Clinical Teaching Faculty, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only — they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2010 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

adam.com

Disclaimer: This content including advice provides generic information only. It is in no way a substitute for qualified medical opinion. Always consult a specialist or your own doctor for more information. NDTV does not claim responsibility for this information.

Tags: , .

Leave a comment